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Does anyone else regret starting on a 600?(cbr600rr)

  #21  
Old 02-13-2014, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Kuroshio View Post
Honestly it sounds like a mental issue. One which you will or won't overcome on your own terms.

Reading your comments so far I'm not sure a smaller bike would truly help to overcome your mental blocks. A bike's engine size has little to do with feeling nervous about sharing the road with cages imo.

What are you afraid of specifically?
To be 100% accurate, Id call it a psychological issue. Saying mental issue is implying the OP is "slow", which I dont think is the case.

Also, if all of his attention is diverted away from whats going on around the bike(ie cars, corners, etc)and is focused instead on corralling a race oriented bike I can definitely see him having quite a few "brain farts" and eventually becoming nervous. Hence why they call smaller, less apt bikes "confidence inspiring".
 
  #22  
Old 02-13-2014, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by singram View Post
To be 100% accurate, Id call it a psychological issue. Saying mental issue is implying the OP is "slow", which I dont think is the case.

Also, if all of his attention is diverted away from whats going on around the bike(ie cars, corners, etc)and is focused instead on corralling a race oriented bike I can definitely see him having quite a few "brain farts" and eventually becoming nervous. Hence why they call smaller, less apt bikes "confidence inspiring".
Mental, psychological... to-MAY-toe, to-MAH-toe. There was no implication that he's mentally slow. And obviously you understood I meant it's all in his mind. My opinion is if he can't overcome it, he needs to stop now before he becomes a danger to himself and everyone on the road.

This is why I said the bike size doesn't matter and asked what scares him specifically
Another concern that scares me is actually taking this bike onto the main street. I live in a small neighboorhood that only has one road to enter/leave the neighborhood. It's a 55 mile road, and every car litereally goes at least 65 on this road ):
I don't know how i'll be able to actually take the bike onto the road cause the cars scare me. someone suggested to me to do my first ride late at night where are like almost no cars(like at 1am) I can see how this will work but I'm still not too sure if I want to ride that late at night.
I love just riding around when hardly any cars are around me but the moment a car starts approaching me I get really nervous
Being scared of making a mistake or not being fully (or even partially) in control is natural. It's an internal fear. He's new to riding. Seat time and education cures that. But feeling nervous when other vehicles are on the road with him is troublesome to me. It's an external fear. I've seen the dangers presented by those people who are scared to drive on the freeway but do anyway. Their timidity causes them to be unpredictable, react irrationally (swerving / braking when a vehicle approaches next to them) and makes them a danger to themselves and others. A smaller bike may instill confidence in his ability to control the bike or correct mistakes. But a SUV driven by a soccer mom will still be a SUV driven by a soccer mom.

When I started riding on my F3 I had both types of fears, internal and external. Scared I was gonna screw up (I did and lowsided). Scared I wasn't in control and I wasn't (accidental wheelies, locking up the front brakes). And I must have taken the street route to work for a month because I was scared to get on the freeway. I still have some of the internal fears occasionally (lowsided again, learning clutch up / power wheelies). But if I couldn't get over the nervousness traffic caused me, I would have quit with the F3. I can't ride on a road by myself. And that type of nervousness can be just as deadly as a throttle mistake.
 
  #23  
Old 02-13-2014, 03:50 PM
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I started out on a F4 2000 and at first (4 months) I thought it was the fastest damn thing on the street lol. It gets up and moves but eventually I got a little bored of taking her up to redline 13.5rpm through all the gears that just wasn't fast enough to me. I considered getting a 250 before purchasing this 600 and damn am I glad I didn't. 250's would really bore me no power even in high rpm band it's still just not that fast. But they are super light and great on gas which I give props to. I want to ride a 1000cc to see what it is like, I want my knuckles to turn white hehe
 
  #24  
Old 02-13-2014, 04:50 PM
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Being scared of making a mistake or not being fully (or even partially) in control is natural. It's an internal fear. He's new to riding. Seat time and education cures that. But feeling nervous when other vehicles are on the road with him is troublesome to me. It's an external fear. I've seen the dangers presented by those people who are scared to drive on the freeway but do anyway. Their timidity causes them to be unpredictable, react irrationally (swerving / braking when a vehicle approaches next to them) and makes them a danger to themselves and others. A smaller bike may instill confidence in his ability to control the bike or correct mistakes. But a SUV driven by a soccer mom will still be a SUV driven by a soccer mom.

When I started riding on my F3 I had both types of fears, internal and external. Scared I was gonna screw up (I did and lowsided). Scared I wasn't in control and I wasn't (accidental wheelies, locking up the front brakes). And I must have taken the street route to work for a month because I was scared to get on the freeway. I still have some of the internal fears occasionally (lowsided again, learning clutch up / power wheelies). But if I couldn't get over the nervousness traffic caused me, I would have quit with the F3. I can't ride on a road by myself. And that type of nervousness can be just as deadly as a throttle mistake.
External/Internal fears? I'm thinking stimuli is the word your reaching for. Fear is an emotion that manifests from a stimuli be it internal(imaginary), or external(hitting a pothole and accidentally blipping the throttle, etc), but whathaveyou, I think we mean the same thing.

My original point(which you never even addressed) was that fear in one area can and does manifest itself in another. What I mean is lets say that OP is perfectly confident in his ability to handle the bike in his very limited environment. Large parking lots, deadend streets with no traffic, whatever. Now place him in an environment with alot of 4-wheeled stimuli. His fear of "will I succesfully handle the bike in this new situation" comes into play. But not from the cars, from his lack of confidence in handling the bike itself.

Re-read my last 2 posts. I'm no psychology major(and I doubt you are either), but I do have a handfull of screws and 2 plates that say this can and does happen
 
  #25  
Old 02-13-2014, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by singram View Post
External/Internal fears? I'm thinking stimuli is the word your reaching for. Fear is an emotion that manifests from a stimuli be it internal(imaginary), or external(hitting a pothole and accidentally blipping the throttle, etc), but whathaveyou, I think we mean the same thing.

My original point(which you never even addressed) was that fear in one area can and does manifest itself in another. What I mean is lets say that OP is perfectly confident in his ability to handle the bike in his very limited environment. Large parking lots, deadend streets with no traffic, whatever. Now place him in an environment with alot of 4-wheeled stimuli. His fear of "will I succesfully handle the bike in this new situation" comes into play. But not from the cars, from his lack of confidence in handling the bike itself.

Re-read my last 2 posts. I'm no psychology major(and I doubt you are either), but I do have a handfull of screws and 2 plates that say this can and does happen
To-MAY-toe, to-MAH-toe. Semantics doesn't change the fact that, as others have said, riding a motorcycle isn't for everyone. It's natural when performing any new activity which can lead to serious injury or death to have fears and doubts about one's own abilities. But in this particular case I don't believe his fear of learning to ride and control a 600cc is leading to his nervousness about traffic. The OP can correct me if I'm wrong.

I won't push anyone into getting on a motorcycle if they're not psychologically ready to handle the general aspects of riding and the situations they will encounter. I'd prefer that person to save his time, money and (potentially) life by not throwing a leg over in the first place.
 
  #26  
Old 02-13-2014, 06:06 PM
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In my best Monty Python voice, "Please, please! This is supposed to be a happy occasion! Let's not bicker and argue about who killed who."
 
  #27  
Old 02-14-2014, 06:43 PM
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Hey guys, thanks again for pitching in again, sorry for the late reply too.

I read what you guys have posted, and I went for a ride(again in my neighborhood) the other day and I took some time to evaluate my riding skills and also my bike.

I think my 'fears' and problems are a mixture of both of what kuroshio and singram are saying. Where my riding skills stand... I'm still occasionally choppy with throttle, I suck at doing emergency braking, I have to slow down as much as possible and take turns and corners very slowly, and I can't confidently lean over with the bike. But with that said, again, I am much better than day one and improving everyday(at least I think I am).
But basically.. I'm not confident in my riding skills at all
Now pair my this up with a busy road filled with wreckless driving/cars all around me with drivers who barely even notice me on the road, yes, I am terrified to drive out of my neighborhood and start driving on the road.


"I won't push anyone into getting on a motorcycle if they're not psychologically ready to handle the general aspects of riding and the situations they will encounter. I'd prefer that person to save his time, money and (potentially) life by not throwing a leg over in the first place."

kuroshio, I wish I'm able to take more classes and basic riding courses to prepare me for riding, but I just can't afford too. I'm still young and I've paid everything for my riding out of my own pocket, which I have saved for about a year, that's including my gear, bike, and MSF classes. I simply loved riding once I tried it on my friends 250 for the first time 5 months ago, and I loved it even more once I was learning on the 125 at the MSF course. I thought I was prepaired well enough to start on a 600, but I've unfortunately discovered, I am no where near capable to operate the machine, safely. But I really love my bike, it's one of those love-hate relationships, and I know that once I can comfortably ride it, it'll defiantely be worth it all. So I'm trying my best to learn, I'm not in a rush, but I am running out of fuel and would like to be able to make a trip to the gas station soon haha. Oh, and you asked me what specifically scares me, and it's pretty much what I have just typed up above, its my skills(which I am not confident in) and cars around me once I hit the road. I know it's something all riders deal with-- cars all around them. But I just can't grab to courage to set myself onto the Main road because of my lack of confidence in my riding
 
  #28  
Old 02-14-2014, 08:44 PM
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Take your bike to an empty lot and practice your clutch control, braking, turns and looking through them, do it where you wont have to worry about other cars or outside distractions. Heck have a friend come with a bunch of cones and set them up to aid you. If you feel so uncomfortable on a 600 than get a 250 or 300 or 500 or 550 or 650 if you can and ride that around and build your confidence in yourself and your abilities.

Edit: You are physically capable, what you seem to be struggling with is if you are mentally ok with the inherent dangers that come with this passion. Check out "The Twist of the Wrist" books they can help you learn about what you are doing. There is also a movie that goes along with the books but I'm not sure where you can find it.
 

Last edited by CJardine; 02-14-2014 at 08:49 PM.
  #29  
Old 02-14-2014, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by tkddns308 View Post
Hey guys, thanks again for pitching in again, sorry for the late reply too.

I read what you guys have posted, and I went for a ride(again in my neighborhood) the other day and I took some time to evaluate my riding skills and also my bike.

I think my 'fears' and problems are a mixture of both of what kuroshio and singram are saying. Where my riding skills stand... I'm still occasionally choppy with throttle, I suck at doing emergency braking, I have to slow down as much as possible and take turns and corners very slowly, and I can't confidently lean over with the bike. But with that said, again, I am much better than day one and improving everyday(at least I think I am).
But basically.. I'm not confident in my riding skills at all
Now pair my this up with a busy road filled with wreckless driving/cars all around me with drivers who barely even notice me on the road, yes, I am terrified to drive out of my neighborhood and start driving on the road.


"I won't push anyone into getting on a motorcycle if they're not psychologically ready to handle the general aspects of riding and the situations they will encounter. I'd prefer that person to save his time, money and (potentially) life by not throwing a leg over in the first place."

kuroshio, I wish I'm able to take more classes and basic riding courses to prepare me for riding, but I just can't afford too. I'm still young and I've paid everything for my riding out of my own pocket, which I have saved for about a year, that's including my gear, bike, and MSF classes. I simply loved riding once I tried it on my friends 250 for the first time 5 months ago, and I loved it even more once I was learning on the 125 at the MSF course. I thought I was prepaired well enough to start on a 600, but I've unfortunately discovered, I am no where near capable to operate the machine, safely. But I really love my bike, it's one of those love-hate relationships, and I know that once I can comfortably ride it, it'll defiantely be worth it all. So I'm trying my best to learn, I'm not in a rush, but I am running out of fuel and would like to be able to make a trip to the gas station soon haha. Oh, and you asked me what specifically scares me, and it's pretty much what I have just typed up above, its my skills(which I am not confident in) and cars around me once I hit the road. I know it's something all riders deal with-- cars all around them. But I just can't grab to courage to set myself onto the Main road because of my lack of confidence in my riding
Moved to the Riding Skills section. Maybe with a little post count (off topic doesn't count) the OP's account will get approved

Honestly, you didn't say anything that aren't displayed in most new riders. Choppy on the throttle, braking at 30% of the bike's braking capability, walking around corners, afraid to lean...

Based on your feedback, I change my opinion. Everything you said is natural for a new (and sane) rider. The skills you said you lack are innate to very VERY few riders (and they prolly all race for a living). You may be expecting too much of yourself too quickly. And I have to ask what do you do when you practice? Is there a structure to it? Specific exercises?

If you're not practicing with any structure to it, it'll be difficult to see and appreciate your improvements. And if you can't see yourself improving, it'll be difficult to find confidence in your skills.
 
  #30  
Old 02-14-2014, 10:35 PM
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Cjardine mentioned Twist of the Wrist. Last time I checked, the full movie can be found on Youtube :P However, I'd recommend Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques by Lee Parks to go with it. The Twist of the Wrist series of books is very good. But I found it to be a bit advanced for a completely new rider. The explanations were excellent. But it lacked somewhat in how to apply it.

Total Control explains things almost as well. But it goes a step further, offering practical exercises that can be performed in a parking lot focusing on the basics, such as throttle control and braking. Parks also runs a class based on the book (in fact the "textbook" for the class are the exercises found in the book). And the classes ARE held in parking lots.

Twist of the Wrist will explain some very necessary things like Survival Reactions, how they can cause you to crash and how to avoid them. Total Control will give you structured exercises you can perform at fairly low speeds to improve your basic riding skills. Oh and a little tip:

Tennis ***** cut in half make great, cheap cones
 

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