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Slow to go fast?

  #1  
Old 12-30-2013, 01:32 PM
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Default Slow to go fast?

We often hear people say that you have to go "Slow to go fast." (I say it too)

What does this mean to you? Have you implemented this, or tried to implement this strategy in your riding at all?
 
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Old 12-30-2013, 01:53 PM
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"Smooth is fast" is what that means to me. But the way I recall that saying is "In slow, out fast" for cornering. And it pretty much means the same thing. If you can slow down, focus on your body position and drive line through the corner, it sets up getting out of the corner on the gas as hard as you want to.
 
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Old 12-30-2013, 03:32 PM
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Slow in fast out only works for so long until you're getting out braked in the corner. Eventually you gotta be fast in and fast out, too. ;D
 
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Old 12-30-2013, 03:41 PM
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[QUOTE=Misti;1261045]We often hear people say that you have to go "Slow to go fast." (I say it too) QUOTE]


I'm familiar with the 'slow in, fast out' approach to corners and I understand what Conrice is saying about being smooth to be fast but I'm hoping there's something I'm missing here so I can learn something.
 
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:19 PM
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I don't know how familiar you guys are with racing, but there's this guy named Troy Croser, who is a 2 time World Superbike champ. It was said about him, that to tell if he was trying, really trying to be the fastest **** out there, you needed a stopwatch, or you'd have no idea he was giving 10/10.

Picking lines, smooth on/off the throttle and brakes, keeping the bike composed, things like that. If you're beating the bike like a rented mule and it's all over the place, you might actually be slowing yourself down.
 
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:25 PM
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Think it indicates a progression. That you can't become fast without learning and practicing at a slower pace first.

It's easier to learn techniques at a slower pace where you can focus more on the technique. New distractions aren't coming up as quickly at a slower pace. You're more receptive to the responses and feedback from the bike, able to more easily see and understand the effects of your actions on the bike.

You learn, practice and master techniques at a slower pace. You then apply what you've learned to achieve a faster pace.

Best illustration I can think of: how fast are you going when scouting out a new road or track?
 
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Old 12-31-2013, 05:59 AM
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Slow in imo is more descriptive of preparation, methodology and execution.
Fast should be the result of the application aforementioned.
 
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Old 01-07-2014, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Kuroshio View Post
Think it indicates a progression. That you can't become fast without learning and practicing at a slower pace first.

It's easier to learn techniques at a slower pace where you can focus more on the technique. New distractions aren't coming up as quickly at a slower pace. You're more receptive to the responses and feedback from the bike, able to more easily see and understand the effects of your actions on the bike.

You learn, practice and master techniques at a slower pace. You then apply what you've learned to achieve a faster pace.

Best illustration I can think of: how fast are you going when scouting out a new road or track?
I think this is a perfect explanation of "going slow to go fast" that you can't become fast without learning and practicing at a slower pace."

If you try too hard to be fast right off the bat, without putting in some slower more methodical riding then you end up riding over your head, flustered, and not riding as quickly as you would like.

Originally Posted by Sprock View Post
Slow in imo is more descriptive of preparation, methodology and execution.
Fast should be the result of the application aforementioned.
Love that you say that "fast should be the result of the aforementioned." This is so very true. You prepare at a slower pace, you find your reference points for example, you figure out your lines and because of this preparation you are able to go faster as the result.

Have you ever gone to a new track and just tried to ride as fast as you could right away? How did that go for you? What programs do you guys have for building up your pace?

Misti
 
  #9  
Old 01-08-2014, 11:12 AM
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Slow is Smooth
Smooth is fast
 
  #10  
Old 01-09-2014, 01:19 PM
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Smooth is fast... pretty much Smooth movements is the way you want to go, roll onto the throttle don't chop it. Pretty much same for racing in general... smooth fluid movements..
 

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