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Body Positioning in a corner question

  #1  
Old 05-10-2011, 08:04 PM
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Default Body Positioning in a corner question

Hey guys, now I've been struggling with this question for the past few days after riding around. When I had the ninja250r (2007) I put all 21,000 miles on her before I sold her, but obviously 21,000 miles DOESN'T necessarily make me or anyone else a better rider. Now I've got the 08' CBR600RR, and love her to death. Squeaky clean after every ride, whether it be on the street, or on the track. Well, since I've had the bike, I've really only put 500+ miles on it. I'm still breaking my ***** into the seat, I guess you could say I never had to stick out a knee on the Ninja because I never took it on turns that required me too. On the CBR, the stories a little more different. I've been told that one should lean there weight using the opposite foot of the corner, and apply some weight on the inside turning handlebar? Now I'm coming to you folks, because quite honestly this communities the best one around to ask about this kind of thing, as even motorcycle riding courses aren't specifically tuned to give advice to these kind of bikes. So, I'm turning to the more "experienced" riders, who can give me some pointers on how to look about going into a corner more confidently. What method should I keep in mind? Are there any tricks you like to use? How do you position your body? Etc.

As always, thanks a whole bunch in advanced for your input guys!
 
  #2  
Old 05-10-2011, 08:10 PM
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Moved to Riding Skills as it's a question for all 600cc + bikes
 
  #3  
Old 05-10-2011, 11:50 PM
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In a nutshell:

Shift your weight to the inside (i.e., move your butt over until your hipbone is just past the edge of the seat, only shifting over 5 or 6 inches, no more than a cheek), lower your torso, and move your head and shoulders along with your hips. Do not rotate the hips around the tank, move everything horizontally. Imagine "kissing" the mirror. Turn your head and LOOK through the turn. Inside arm bent, outside arm straighter. Moving the shoulders and head while looking through the turn is the most important body position change you can do. Don't worry about knees. Don't worry about trying to weight pegs or push on handlebars or any of that. Arms should be relaxed, I can let go and drag fingers on the pavement. This minimal movement doesn't make you look like a crazy street racer but will dramatically improve cornering.

Set your body position before entering the turn. Shifting during the turn upsets the bike and changes the line. Set it and maintain a smooth arc through the turn, applying smooth and slow acceleration once past the apex of the turn.

By moving the head and torso over and down, you shift the center of gravity and cause the bike to require less lean angle for a given turn at the same speed. This translates to a greater tire contact patch, which means more traction.

And, being one of the resident track addicts, I must tell you the best way to learn cornering is at a trackday under qualified supervision. So...do a trackday! You will be assimilated.

By the way, on the average track around here, on my Ninja 250 I have much more corner speed and knee-draggin' than on my 600RR. Guys on other 600's or even 1000's can't keep up with the Ninjette in the corners.
 

Last edited by randyjoy; 05-11-2011 at 12:00 AM.
  #4  
Old 05-11-2011, 12:56 AM
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youve done 500 miles on a machine with more than double your last bike. CHILL OUT.
your progression will come IN TIME.

do a search for countersteering, and practice it a little. it DOES work.

Go and do an advanced rider training course, they are utterly, totally worth every cent, you get one on one time, usually at a track, and you will learn alot. Its difficult to diagnose what you need to do exactly without watching you. as a general rule though, body, brakes, gear, gas.
Position body on approach to the corner, make sure you have your body in a position where you are griping the bike so you dont slide forwards when you get on the brakes, gripping the tank with your knees is a good way to do this.
Brakes, look ahead for your braking point, and your tip in/apex of he corner
gear, select the gear you want to be in to power out of the corner on sustained, consistent positive throttle
gas, select the point at which you can get on the gas coming out of the corner. once you open the throttle in a corner, you should continue to roll it on. if you have to button off again, you did something wrong.

Once you are doing all this while sitting mostly straight up on the bike, start adding sideways movement in the saddle as your speed increases, and leaning into the corner.

Some will argue points about weighting the pegs as well, and others will tell youits bull****. give it a go, mix and match a little to find what works for YOU. everyone has a slightly different style and this can be influenced by weight, height, strength, confidence, bike, setup, tyres, and many more things.
 
  #5  
Old 05-11-2011, 12:57 AM
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youve done 500 miles on a machine with more than double your last bike. CHILL OUT.
your progression will come IN TIME.

do a search for countersteering, and practice it a little. it DOES work.

Go and do an advanced rider training course, they are utterly, totally worth every cent, you get one on one time, usually at a track, and you will learn alot. Its difficult to diagnose what you need to do exactly without watching you. as a general rule though, body, brakes, gear, gas.
Position body on approach to the corner, make sure you have your body in a position where you are griping the bike so you dont slide forwards when you get on the brakes, gripping the tank with your knees is a good way to do this.
Brakes, look ahead for your braking point, and your tip in/apex of he corner
gear, select the gear you want to be in to power out of the corner on sustained, consistent positive throttle
gas, select the point at which you can get on the gas coming out of the corner. once you open the throttle in a corner, you should continue to roll it on. if you have to button off again, you did something wrong.

Once you are doing all this while sitting mostly straight up on the bike, start adding sideways movement in the saddle as your speed increases, and leaning into the corner.

Some will argue points about weighting the pegs as well, and others will tell youits bull****. give it a go, mix and match a little to find what works for YOU. everyone has a slightly different style and this can be influenced by weight, height, strength, confidence, bike, setup, tyres, and many more things.
 
  #6  
Old 05-11-2011, 05:52 AM
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The best way to learn is to practice in a safe environment....not the street. Try a track day. I just did 2 days with Tony's Track Days at Thunderbolt NJ and it was great. They also do have classes, private instructors and a body positioning seminar that are and were very helpful. Each time I am at the track my skills improve quite a bit. Don't practice on the street. Plus you have too many people giving alot of advice (albeit good) you can get too in your head. Sometimes just getting out on the track and going for it makes all the difference.
 
  #7  
Old 05-11-2011, 11:00 AM
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  #8  
Old 05-11-2011, 12:05 PM
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Track days! Track days! Track days!

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  #9  
Old 05-11-2011, 12:30 PM
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That Sport Rider Magazine post was a nice read ...
 
  #10  
Old 05-11-2011, 02:08 PM
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Great information here, thanks a bunch guys, I'll definitely jot down alot of the key points in information links here! Again thanks to all that contributed/will contribute, and thanks to the moderator who moved this to the appropriate thread!
 

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