Body position and stability - CBR Forum - Enthusiast forums for Honda CBR Owners


Riding Skills Want to improve your skills on or off the track?

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 08-30-2017, 06:27 PM
Misti's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Posts: 93
Default Body position and stability

In one of Keith Code's articles titled, Body position, he talks about his first "law" of body positioning which is "Stability Comes in Pairs. Bike and rider stability are always paired―rider instability transfers directly to the bike."

What do you think he means when he says that rider instability transfers directly into the bike? What kinds of things can show up in someones riding if they are unstable on their bike?

The full article can be found here:

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-04-2017, 09:22 PM
sjona2011's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Monticello, Indiana
Posts: 743
Default

makes sense, the rider accounts for 40% of the total weight, give or take. So if a rider isnt stable, they're moving around, potentially loading/unloading the suspension. Move 40% of any vehicles weight around, even slightly, it will absolutely become unstable.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-14-2017, 01:33 PM
Misti's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Posts: 93
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjona2011 View Post
makes sense, the rider accounts for 40% of the total weight, give or take. So if a rider isnt stable, they're moving around, potentially loading/unloading the suspension. Move 40% of any vehicles weight around, even slightly, it will absolutely become unstable.
exactly. So what can a rider do to ensure that he/she is stable on their bike so there is less instability with the machine?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-16-2017, 07:48 AM
sjona2011's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Monticello, Indiana
Posts: 743
Default

Well for myself, good grippy pegs and grip pads on the tank helped tremendously. They allowed me to support myself with my lower body, instead of using the handlebars, so less unwanted input to the front end.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-18-2017, 01:10 PM
Misti's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Posts: 93
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjona2011 View Post
Well for myself, good grippy pegs and grip pads on the tank helped tremendously. They allowed me to support myself with my lower body, instead of using the handlebars, so less unwanted input to the front end.
Yes awesome! Tank pads or stomp grip on the tank can really help. And supporting yourself with your lower body as you said so perfectly will help you be more relaxed with your upper body so that you don't have to grip the bars so tightly and have unwanted input in the front. Well said.

So how exactly might you use your lower body to support yourself and get the weight off your arms? What are some tips and techniques to allow you to be the most relaxed with your arms/hands and why is that good for the bike?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-18-2017, 08:59 PM
sjona2011's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Monticello, Indiana
Posts: 743
Default

Well most of the time i still have to tell myself 'hey dumbass, let go!' but keeping yourself supported with your lower body keeps your weight more centralized on the bike, especially under braking.
This last weekend I was at BFR, and found that the front was less jittery(best way I could describe) under hard braking when I supported by body with my knees instead of the bars, plus the rear didnt come up and bounce around as much
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-25-2017, 05:08 PM
SunBlue's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 140
Default

I'm no expert but in addition to what everyone else said, trying not to use the handlebars to support my weight so much when I'm shifting my body weight side to side.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-25-2017, 06:36 PM
Rybo's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 74
Default

Rider instability is also what makes slow speed maneuvering so difficult for new riders. When I took the MSF course the instructor did two demos of a slow u-turn in the box, one with his weight supported by his hands on the bars, and the other with his weight supported with his lower body by gripping the bike with thighs and knees. Even with 20 years of riding experience, the first u-turn was wobbly with an erratic arc, but once he relaxed his arms and did it the second time while gripping the bike with his legs it was smooth as butter. Sure enough, after I tried it myself slow speed maneuvering became a breeze.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-25-2017, 07:28 PM
SunBlue's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 140
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rybo View Post
Rider instability is also what makes slow speed maneuvering so difficult for new riders. When I took the MSF course the instructor did two demos of a slow u-turn in the box, one with his weight supported by his hands on the bars, and the other with his weight supported with his lower body by gripping the bike with thighs and knees. Even with 20 years of riding experience, the first u-turn was wobbly with an erratic arc, but once he relaxed his arms and did it the second time while gripping the bike with his legs it was smooth as butter. Sure enough, after I tried it myself slow speed maneuvering became a breeze.
Thats a good tip, even after almost 2 yrs of riding I havent gotten tight u turns down. Gunna practice that next time
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-28-2017, 01:42 PM
Misti's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Posts: 93
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjona2011 View Post
Well most of the time i still have to tell myself 'hey dumbass, let go!' but keeping yourself supported with your lower body keeps your weight more centralized on the bike, especially under braking.
This last weekend I was at BFR, and found that the front was less jittery(best way I could describe) under hard braking when I supported by body with my knees instead of the bars, plus the rear didnt come up and bounce around as much
Absolutely. Squeezing the tank with your lower body keeps you stable and can help keep the weight off your arms. Without that, no matter how much time you say, "hey dumbs, let go!" you won't be able to! lol.

Now someone asked about moving across the bike from side to side, what are some methods that you can use to remain stable with your lower body WHILE moving across the bike?
Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Body position DammitMike Sights 'N Sounds 10 06-19-2011 04:04 PM
Dragging Knees and Body Position viper F4i - Main Forum 28 05-28-2008 10:14 AM
Chicken strips, body position, speed, and the street? krash Off Topic 37 04-06-2007 03:57 AM
Full tuck body position snowboarding82 Off Topic 4 09-13-2006 07:11 PM
stability question for '02 f4i 98f3pilot F4i - Main Forum 10 09-06-2006 04:01 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Advertising
Featured Sponsors
Vendor Directory

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:01 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.