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Front sprocket

  #1  
Old 04-20-2014, 11:51 PM
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Default Front sprocket

Just bought my '01 f4i and was told the sprockets and chain were changed out by the previous owner but he didn't know by how much. Riding the bike home I was annoyed by the high rpms on the highway and the incorrect speedo. From what I've been able to find on here the stock for my bike is 16 front and 46 rear.
Counted mine and it's 15 front and 46 rear. So my question that haven't been able to find is if I change the front sprocket back to a 16 tooth one, will I need to replace the chain also?

Anything else that could affect the speedo error that I'm not thinking about?
 
  #2  
Old 04-21-2014, 02:45 AM
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How high does engine rpm get up to while cruising at highway speed? 65mph or 85 mph?
 
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Old 04-21-2014, 08:35 AM
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If I remember correctly it's about 6500 to 7000 rpm at 75 mph (actual mph is 65)
 
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Old 04-21-2014, 09:22 AM
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should be a 16 on the front

For stock that is, if you want even less rpm's decrease the rear a tooth or two
but make sure there's enough adjustment to slide the rear wheel back to take
up added chain slack from a smaller rear

So larger front and smaller rear equals less rpm and less accel'

Smaller front and larger rear equals more rpm and more accel' (wheelie machine)
 
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Old 04-21-2014, 09:41 AM
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Ok so from what your saying sprock, I won't need to replace my chain if I just go back to the stock 16T up front. Right now the chain is reading in between the replace chain and the new chain marks. But then again it is also quite loose right now and I need to tighten it since the previous owner didn't know how to do any of this.
 
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Old 04-21-2014, 01:51 PM
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Bigger sprocket will use more chain, you'll be fine.
 
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Old 04-21-2014, 03:05 PM
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Just got my chain tightened and it now shows just over the replace chain line. With the extra tooth it should send it in the right direction.

[IMG][/IMG]

On to another issue (don't want to keep starting multiple new threads for the same bike)

My clutch cable goes right in front of my speedo. Kind of a nuisance to look around it to see the trip. Any ideas how to fix? Will upload a pic when I get a chance.
 

Last edited by dscott3984; 04-21-2014 at 03:14 PM.
  #8  
Old 04-21-2014, 03:10 PM
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[IMG][/IMG]


[IMG][/IMG]
 
  #9  
Old 04-21-2014, 03:56 PM
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Before saying whether or not to replace your sprockets and chain, I'd have to see what the sprockets look like. The front sprocket is 16T stock and the rear is 46. If you have steel sprockets and they're worn, they will cause the chain to wear RAPIDLY. Aluminum sprockets will absorb the majority of the wear in the system, but need frequent replacement. IF your sprockets are steel and in good condition I would leave them alone. Put the 16T on the front. From what you're saying, you'll be much happier with that setup. As for the chain, I would replace it. The bigger sprocket up front will put the chain somewhere back into the "serviceable" range, but not by much. I would definitely not trust any previous owner to have maintained such a delicate and essential yet easily overlooked component. I lost a chain on my first bike and I've never let it happen since, but I've been out with guys who lost theirs. The best case scenario - it will ruin your ride and leave you stranded. Moving up the disaster scale from there, a chain whipping around can cause SUBSTANTIAL and CATASTROPHIC damage to your motorcycle (mine sucked up into the engine and blew out the water pump). And, finally, the worst case scenario - the chain hits your leg causing SERIOUS injury and most likely a crash, or causes the rear wheel to lock up, most likely causing a crash and SERIOUS injury. If you're still not convinced, a decent way to quickly check your chain is to get down on the ground behind the bike and try to move the lower free portion of the chain (between the two sprockets) from side to side. There should be almost no deflection side-to-side. A better way to check the chain is to get the rear wheel off the ground, adjust the chain so there's about an inch of free play at the mid point between the two sprockets, and then slowly turn the rear wheel, checking to make sure that the free play stays the same no matter what position the chain is in.
 
  #10  
Old 04-21-2014, 04:00 PM
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The clutch cable is a design flaw on the F4i. I don't know of any way to fix it. A shorter cable would not have enough slack to allow the bars to turn all the way to the left. Try searching the forum though, it's likely someone has come up with a solution to this problem.
 

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