Drag Racing Raced a guy from a light? Been to a night at the track?? Tell your story here.

Old 750 vs. any new 600

  #11  
Old 04-13-2008, 06:21 PM
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Default RE: Old 750 vs. any new 600

Donohu make it really simple for the guy, tell him to throw a couple hundy on a race, if he wont tell him to shut it. If he will, take is money and tell him to shut it.
 
  #12  
Old 04-24-2008, 12:34 PM
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Default RE: Old 750 vs. any new 600

We tried to get him to come to the strip to settle it but he never came
 
  #13  
Old 11-16-2008, 10:29 AM
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Default RE: Old 750 vs. any new 600

Donohu40

...The 750 in question made all of 85hp stock. He claims this doesnt matter since he has a jet kit and exhaust(and thats all).
The 750 always weighs 491lbs dry. And the rear tire size is 140, not that it can lose traction anyway.

The 03 600rr on the other hand makes something like 107 hp and the dry weight is something like 375.(Im kinda guessing on these numbers)


Even my 97 F3 made like 90 hp and weighs like 420 wet.

But he stills claims he can beat us.
I know what you mean about people talking smack and not being able to back it up. I get tired of it. Generally the people that do most of the smack talking are the ones usually with the least experience. Such is life.

I cant say how the 1987 Kaws run, however my father used to race pro-stock bike back in the mid 1970s. He (and his brother Ken) started on a pair stock Kawasaki 750 H 2 Mach IV two stroke triples in 1975. In full dressed stock trim they ran pretty impressive times (mid 12s). The stock chassis bikes weighed ~465+ lbs. and keeping the front end down under hard launches became an issue so they made wheelie bars for the stock frames. Being able to dump the clutch at full song they were able to get them to dip into the 11s. Poor quality slicks on the chassis put them in the low 11s. Soon afterwards they built the the pro-stock chassis bikes they became well known for. The same stock engines on the lighter frames with a quality M&H Racemaster 4" slick would run mid 10s all day long and keep the bike on the wheelie bars through 4th gear.
Finally my dad did some internal work (cut the piston skirts a bit, did some carb tuning, and sprocket changing) and the bike would consistently run low 10s even on the worst of days.
In 1979 my dad cut a great light and kept the bike on the bars into 5th grear and thought he was finally going to get his first 9 second pass. When the front came down it he couldn't hang on to it as the bars started "tank slapping" from one side to the other a few times. He let go and went through the traps at ~136 mph on his @ss! He had all the leathers on and only had very minor scratches thankfully. Unfortunetly the bike was cooked, however he built a much more advanced chassis after the fact. Unfortunately drag racing was dwindling down so the local strip closed and the other two closest drag strips are 3.5 and 5 hours away! These are still the closest two tracks[sm=boohoo.gif]. The payouts from the far away tracks barely covered the fuel/food expenses and the sponsors back then were pretty few and far between and usually pretty cheap. My uncle Kenny got out first and my dad raced until 1981.
My dad has built hot rods/muscle cars ever since and I started racing back in 2004 but have been limited to 4 wheeled supercharged muscle machines.
I cant wait to take my F3 to the track next spring. I thought of building a pro-stock type bike and using my white/purple F3 as the donor, but I just don't have the money to race enough to justify it.

The 1973 Kawasaki 750 triple is only rated at 71 horsepower and as stated weighs 465 lbs. Not that great but it got the job done and ran quicker then anyone else back then. Even the 1100s couldnt touch those little 750s.





 

Last edited by daniel_depetro; 03-10-2009 at 10:59 AM.
  #14  
Old 12-02-2008, 06:41 AM
Join Date: Apr 2006
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Default RE: Old 750 vs. any new 600

ORIGINAL: jpedrogb

Hi guys,

A video is better than a 1000 words .

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EraPZC9_bxE

Enjoy!
this guy who the video is on needs to got to a school to learn the proper way to ride...
 
  #15  
Old 06-11-2009, 11:20 AM
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Default

Originally Posted by Donohu40 View Post
It's been a while since my first post on this but this discussion came up again at a party. This time the guy with the 87 kawi 750 said he can beat my freind on his '03 600rr. And not because of skill, he basically said if the same rider took both bikes down the track his would win.

I was kinda tired of hearing about it so I took some time to look up the specs and everything on both bikes.

The 750 in question made all of 85hp stock. He claims this doesn't matter since he has a jet kit and exhaust(and thats all).
The 750 always weighs 491lbs dry. And the rear tire size is 140, not that it can lose traction anyway.

The 03 600rr on the other hand makes something like 107 hp and the dry weight is something like 375.(I'm kinda guessing on these numbers)


Even my 97 F3 made like 90 hp and weighs like 420 wet.

But he stills claims he can beat us.

Oh and he's never launched his bike from a stop.

It's just frustrating argueing with someone that is brainwashed to think kawi's can beat anything no matter what.



yea like thrity horsepower and fifty pounds is a huge difference on bikes there is no old bike that can out run 600s motor to motor and the reason why that guy beat that 900rr is cuz he ahd a turbo. turbos just make a bike go faster and faster and faster hell i see new 600s w/turbos out run zx-14s all day . and kawis suck just like their other half of the company susucki
 

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