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Need help regaining confidence

  #1  
Old 05-06-2010, 02:36 PM
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Default Need help regaining confidence

I'm not sure if this is the right section... But I'm having a problem... I got it in my head sometime last year that I wanted a motorcycle, I absolutely had to have one, and I needed one... So I struggled, and saved, and struggled s'more, and finally put out 1200 for a 1992CBR600F2. She was a beautiful bike, I loved her. On top of the 1200 I then put out another 600 for gear etc. Well about 3 days ago I got nervous (being a new rider and all, just finished the MSF course) because of a driver tailgating me as I got to my turning area...

I believe that I by self error, misjudged my entry speed, and laid the bike down at 30mph, totaling it. If it was not me who did it, the motorist close behind me clipped my rear fender at the least. Cause they saw me wreck, but they didn't stop. Either way, I am having some serious trouble regaining confidence, I might lose my job because I have missed a couple days in a row now due to this accident, and I am absolutely and totally conflicted over whether to get a new bike, or get a car now and give up on riding...

I want to ride again, but whenever I think about the crash, looking at my wrecked bike that I had worked so hard for... and thinking about the impact it had on my friends and family, (negatively) it makes it hard for me to figure out what I want to do. I was just wondering if you guys had any kind of advice as to what I could do to regain confidence, or decide what to do about this situation... thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 05-06-2010, 02:54 PM
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they say that this is the point where people really decide whether they are motorcycle riders or not - it's not before the first time you ride one, it's whether you get back on after the first wreck.

knowing what happened to lay the bike down would be a big first step forward. if you can identify what you did (and what you should have done differently) you can make it part of the learning process. a little time will usually help settle the nerves.
 
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:48 PM
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Thanks Regen, that helped a little, the more I think about riding the more I want to get another bike, I'll just have to give it more and more thought I suppose. See how this all comes together at the head.
 
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Old 05-06-2010, 04:54 PM
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Well first thing is first: get your body right and get back to work. Your health and welfare are the most important things.

If I were in your shoes, I'd go retake the BRC asap and then decide. Not because I think you need more training. But because I think getting back on a bike in a controlled environment will help bring you back in touch with riding. Remove the hazards, remove the worry and just ride. When you're done, you can decide if what you felt during that time is worth the risks and reinvesting in riding. Because riding is risky. It can't be helped. But with time and practice, what you felt during the BRC is what you'll feel when riding with the insane cagers and chitty roads. Because you'll get to the point where that's all pretty mundane, just another day on I95.

Also during the BRC, you'll have a chance to talk with one of the instructors and relate what happened. See if he / she can help analyze what happened. Not looking for what you or the cager did wrong. Blaming yourself or them doesn't do any good. But try to figure out how to prevent it again in the future. Things you can practice, to help handle that turn.

If you do decide to start riding again, take it slow. Don't jump straight into commuting to work and looking for twisties to straighten. In fact, I'd recommend not riding during the work week at all. Wait till the weekend, when traffic and the pressure of getting to Point A by XX:XX:XX time on other drivers is lighter. And where you're riding to is the nearest, biggest, emptiest parking lot to practice. Practice every drill they had during the BRC (tennis ***** cut in half make great cones) and make up a few of your own. Practice until what you want the bike to do is no longer a thought. But its an action your body simply begins on its own and the bike follows. You'll know when you hit that point when you find yourself starting to experiment, like transferring your weight around and playing with the brakes during turns.

Your confidence will come back. But the biggest step is still in front of you right now: throwing your leg over the bike. You went down before you could really discover the joy of riding. You were still a shaky newbie, prolly still running through your mental checklist on how to setup and execute a turn. But everyone gets beyond that with time and practice.
 
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Old 05-06-2010, 05:01 PM
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Thanks Kuro for the kind words, It seemed like I was lost on what to do for a while... but now as I listen to more and more advice from other more experienced riders I am learning and regaining confidence as we speak, I just need to gather the money for a new bike... and not feel comfortable too quickly on this one.
 
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Old 05-06-2010, 05:20 PM
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Another thing I'd suggest is picking up either Twist of the Wrist 2 by Keith Code or Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatsch. In both books I found a bunch of little but extremely important things that weren't covered during the BRC or glossed over for the sake of time. Nick's book is slightly better imo cause Code tends to overly-dumb things down.

You seem like a Thinker: someone that finds comfort and stability when they understand something fully. Those books will provide the Why to some of the things the MSF simply said Do. And explain things about motorcycle dynamics they simply didn't cover during the BRC.

I'm a Thinker too. And I found myself more confident after reading and absorbing the material in those books. Because I felt that now I knew why the bike acted this way or that way, I could control when it did act like that meet my needs.
 
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Old 05-06-2010, 10:24 PM
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Yeah I've been thinking about picking up either of those books for a while now, but I will for sure now that you've recommended it, thanks. Now I'm trying to figure out whether I want a cruiser or another CBR :O
 
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Old 05-06-2010, 10:33 PM
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Another CBR, of course!

That means full coverage? And good thing you were okay, that's most important man.
 
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Old 05-07-2010, 12:45 AM
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lol I need to get full coverage on this one... my F2 got totaled, and it had minimum... so I plan on hopefully getting a BRAND NEW F4I, if I can find a co-signer... (being I'm 18 with no credit.)
 
  #10  
Old 05-07-2010, 02:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Goloth View Post
lol I need to get full coverage on this one... my F2 got totaled, and it had minimum... so I plan on hopefully getting a BRAND NEW F4I, if I can find a co-signer... (being I'm 18 with no credit.)
Your young man, and so am i. However i never laid down my bike going 30mph, i stated on my little ninja 250ex and that was what helped me gain confidence. I didnt take any motorcycle safty class, so your already better off that when i started! the only advice i can give you is dont worry about your accident, get out there and ride! Its well worth it, as long as you know what you are doing and taking things slow. I personally wouldnt not get a brand new f4i (they dont make them anymore) however their are so many great used ones out their. Even a CBR600rr Wink wink . Just take things slower, practice more around a big parking lot or gather some of your buddies to ride with you and teach you tips. but take things slow. Very slow. I say save up your money and buy a new bike! I can assure you that everyday you'll walk outside, look at your bike, and say "that's all mine". Atleast that's how i am! Im proud to walk outside and know that i worked for my cbr. One 30mph accident is nothing shake it off and start over. And a cruiser? sick lol cbr. Crazy bitchin race machine. thats what it stands for. yup.
 

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