Street Skills Information to keep you from rashing your bike or yourself. Safe riding techniques only please.

Countersteer

  #1  
Old 01-13-2017, 01:43 PM
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Default Countersteer

Ever had that feeling that the bike won't drop into a corner and wants to go straight on, push down on the bar one the side that you want the bike to turn to, I.e. If you want to turn left push down on the left grip, it's forces you to countersteer, the bike will drop straight in and you'll go round like your on rails, have a try next time you're out, we always countersteer at speeds above 15mph it's just that we don't realise we're doing it, also if you go into a corner and feel you're going too fast, don't panic, push down hard and crank her over, she will go round! 😄
 
  #2  
Old 01-13-2017, 02:34 PM
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I'd like to make one small correction if I may:

Instead of pushing DOWN, press that bar FORWARD. Make your arm movements parallel to the ground and you'll find that keeping that habit allows for more effective steering.
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-2017, 02:40 PM
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Agreed, pushing forward is what your trying to achieve, I kept away from describing it in that way just in case a very inexperienced rider did so and gave it a hard "shove" forward with disastrous results 😄, pushing downward still works but excerpts a more controlled forward motion, but yes a slight forward movement of the bar causes the countersteer.
 
  #4  
Old 01-13-2017, 02:52 PM
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Maybe you haven't seen too many Brand Noobians. They're so scared and tense on the bike that "shoving" isn't likely to be a problem, usually it's the opposite; they're timid and often fight their steering. Experienced riders do it too; put unwanted opposite input into the other bar when attempting to steer. Poor, ineffective steering is the #1 reason for single vehicle accidents in motorcycling. Steering is not a skill to be trifled with.
 
  #5  
Old 01-13-2017, 03:09 PM
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That's true, I've done it myself!, about 20 years ago I took a VTR1000 out on a test ride, approached an road island a bit fast and all of a sudden it won't lean!, panic!, I remember an old triumph rider telling me about countersteer, push the bar, it drops straight in, so yes I was basically fighting the steering up until that point, did a similar thing a few years ago on the infamous snake pass in the U.K. On my CBR900 Fireblade , too fast into a corner, drifting onto the wrong side of the road, thought I either force it down here or I'm going straight into that oncoming car, wrestled it down to the point where I thought it would lowside, of course it didn't, it's just having the confidence to haul it over, a less experienced rider would have panicked and stood it up, that said a more experienced rider wouldn't have got himself in that position in the first place ! 😄
 
  #6  
Old 01-13-2017, 05:17 PM
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Keith code covers this all very well in 'Twist Of The Wrist'. You can get it as a book, or watch it on youtube.

Handy for noobs, as it explains a lot of the physics of riding a motorcycle with practical demonstrations that are easy to understand.
 
  #7  
Old 01-18-2017, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Jaybird180 View Post
Maybe you haven't seen too many Brand Noobians. They're so scared and tense on the bike that "shoving" isn't likely to be a problem, usually it's the opposite; they're timid and often fight their steering. Experienced riders do it too; put unwanted opposite input into the other bar when attempting to steer. Poor, ineffective steering is the #1 reason for single vehicle accidents in motorcycling. Steering is not a skill to be trifled with.

Agreed!

I'd say target fixation becomes an issue at this point as well. The more you become fixated, the less countersteer/lean you apply, and the less lean applied, the more likely you head towards the hazard. I had a moment a year or two ago where I was going too fast into a bend on a country road, I was inadvertently keeping the bike somewhat straight whilst trying to brake hard. Fortunately I realised just how fixated I had become and droped my shoulder to lean it in. I got away with it that time but it definitely served as a timely reminder about these things.
 
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