Street Skills Information to keep you from rashing your bike or yourself. Safe riding techniques only please.

Any tips on how to ride distance on CBR?

  #1  
Old 09-13-2012, 09:21 AM
Dragondima's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 330
Default Any tips on how to ride distance on CBR?

Hey guys, basically title explains it. I'm looked for advice on how to position myself to reduce strain on my wrists, back, and body for a few hour ride. Going to Port Jervis this weekend, it's a few hours away, want to get there comfortably on my F4i, but i tend to get pretty tired. I'll take highways mainly there.

Links to video's, articles, or anything visual would be a huge help. Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 09-13-2012, 10:32 AM
DSK
DSK is offline
Junior Member
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 22
Default

Get on bike, ride, lean into the wind to releive pressure on wrists, relax and move occasionly to releive aches. Staying tense, or sitting un naturally will be worse.
 
  #3  
Old 09-13-2012, 10:53 AM
Dragondima's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 330
Default

Originally Posted by DSK View Post
Get on bike, ride, lean into the wind to releive pressure on wrists, relax and move occasionly to releive aches. Staying tense, or sitting un naturally will be worse.
... Those are very common sense things.



Looking for someone who rides the F4i or a CBR that has done long rides, and have used a resource that helped them ride longer distances comfortably.
 
  #4  
Old 09-13-2012, 11:13 AM
Senior Member
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: So Cal
Posts: 379
Default

Originally Posted by Dragondima View Post
... Those are very common sense things.



Looking for someone who rides the F4i or a CBR that has done long rides, and have used a resource that helped them ride longer distances comfortably.
But for some strange reason they seem to work. I would add to give yourself an off the bike break every now and then. For me every 1.5 to 2 hours is best, I'm somewhat of a lightweight when it comes to distance riding.
 
  #5  
Old 09-13-2012, 11:20 AM
zaqwert6's Avatar
Nov 2011 ROTM
Join Date: May 2010
Location: O-Town
Posts: 655
Default

I do occasionally. I've even done NY to FL a couple times, around 1000 miles.

The simple answer is unfortunately there is no simple answer.

If you don't ride like that regularly, there's no quick fix. The issue is your maintaining positions you generally don't for long periods of time. The long answer would be to gradually extend your rides and see what parts of your body are most affected. Some have hand numbness that others dont, shoulder strain....neck strain etc that are unique to each person and bike combination. You just won't know till you your there in it.

Honestly, a few hours is not bad IMO. Your going to have to stop for gas a time or 2 and can stretch your legs and shake it out and so on. So your really just looking at 2 or 3 back to back hour rides. Maybe think of it like that.

So......



I guess my advice is going to be to not stress over the thought of it, that's only going to make it worse. Try and find more than one comfortable position on the bike that you can change up. On the highway I literally lay right on the gas tank, no body stress anywhere but you need to have that flexibility in your lower back. Then I sit very upright so the wind hits me right in the chest and pretty much carries my body weight again. I change hand positions alot, BEFORE they start to ache. Set your trip OD and tell yourself your going to switch something up like every 50 miles or something right on the number.

Lastly don't worry about teh "ride", look around and enjoy the scenery. Check out other cars and landscape whatever....keep your mind off the time on the bike and it will go faster.

Good luck. I'll bet it's not as bad as you thought when you get there.
 
  #6  
Old 09-13-2012, 12:11 PM
Wolzio's Avatar
Official Junior Possum Member
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Albuquerque NM
Posts: 34
Default

Good advice zaqwert! I'm riding to my hometown in Az from New Mexico sometime soon, not the longest of rides, but will be my longest thus far. That'll be helpful to remember
 
  #7  
Old 09-13-2012, 01:18 PM
Senior Member & Lord of The Man Cave
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 1,292
Default

Get a tank bag and fill it up to rest against and install a Throttlemeister to give your right wrist a break now and then.
 
  #8  
Old 09-13-2012, 03:07 PM
Dragondima's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 330
Default

Originally Posted by zaqwert6 View Post
I do occasionally. I've even done NY to FL a couple times, around 1000 miles.

The simple answer is unfortunately there is no simple answer.

If you don't ride like that regularly, there's no quick fix. The issue is your maintaining positions you generally don't for long periods of time. The long answer would be to gradually extend your rides and see what parts of your body are most affected. Some have hand numbness that others dont, shoulder strain....neck strain etc that are unique to each person and bike combination. You just won't know till you your there in it.

Honestly, a few hours is not bad IMO. Your going to have to stop for gas a time or 2 and can stretch your legs and shake it out and so on. So your really just looking at 2 or 3 back to back hour rides. Maybe think of it like that.

So......



I guess my advice is going to be to not stress over the thought of it, that's only going to make it worse. Try and find more than one comfortable position on the bike that you can change up. On the highway I literally lay right on the gas tank, no body stress anywhere but you need to have that flexibility in your lower back. Then I sit very upright so the wind hits me right in the chest and pretty much carries my body weight again. I change hand positions alot, BEFORE they start to ache. Set your trip OD and tell yourself your going to switch something up like every 50 miles or something right on the number.

Lastly don't worry about teh "ride", look around and enjoy the scenery. Check out other cars and landscape whatever....keep your mind off the time on the bike and it will go faster.

Good luck. I'll bet it's not as bad as you thought when you get there.
Thanks man, enjoyed your response a lot. Great advice. My longest ride was probably 6 hours, that includes 5-10 min cig brakes (not me the other rider i was with). The difference is that was a spirited ride, this will be less spirited and just from point a to point b trip. The next day is spirited riding.

I'm buying U-CLEAR HBC100 for the ride. Some nice tunes might help the fairly straight ride.

Thanks!
 
  #9  
Old 09-13-2012, 04:08 PM
zaqwert6's Avatar
Nov 2011 ROTM
Join Date: May 2010
Location: O-Town
Posts: 655
Default

No problem.

The NY to FL was certainly my longest, did it twice. Too stupid to learn the first time I guess. I was young.

Covered it in something around 13/14 hours non stop. (Besides gas and a 20 min meal). It was "spirited" to the say the least but I'm old and less stupider now.

 
  #10  
Old 09-13-2012, 04:51 PM
NewSense45's Avatar
Senior Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Eastern NC
Posts: 203
Default

Originally Posted by gotcbr View Post
Sounds like you have a nice little ride planned. Hope all goes well. Best wishes for your buddy's deployment.

Comfort-wise... the best thing I can recommend is wearing comfortable clothing under your gear. Other tips for 'comfort'... don't be in a hurry... A ride of this sort should be relaxing, not pressured. Make sure to stretch b/f getting on your bike for the first time. Allow time to take as many breaks as possible/necessary. Stretch again as needed. The better hydrated & relaxed you are, the better you will ride (& enjoy)...keep a bottle of water in your tank bag. I don't like to be hungry on rides either... Throw an energy bar/snack in your tank bag to munch on when you feel the need.

Since you're going to be in a group, allow proper spacing...this will keep you less tense than being wheel-to-wheel, so to speak.

Things you check on your bike... are the things you always check on your bike. ;-) Tires/tire pressures, chain, fluids, brake pads, fork seals, etc etc etc. You always want to do a good pre-'flight' check. ;-)

Gauge/Mileage... You should be able to get 150 mi on a tank easily. Since your gauges don't work, you should continue getting gas at whatever interval you are used to (or close to it). The less confusion the better.

Tips... Already added a couple in the 'comfort' topic above. Additionally, someone in the group should take a tire puncture repair kit & a tool kit. Seems there's always one flat in a large group on a long touring ride. Take a micro-fiber towel & cut it in half or smaller & spray it liberally w/ Honda Polish...put it in a ziploc & put it under your seat...then it'll be there when you need it. If you're going to be going thru unincorporated areas that don't have cell coverage or spotty coverage, turn off your cell phone...otherwise, it will keep searching for a signal & drain your battery. Mainly, just be relaxed & not worried about time-constraints.

Weather... It is what it is. I personally don't use rain-gear all that much unless its prolonged storm. However, to ea his own...take it if you normally use it.

Enjoy!
This is the advice I got last week. It was my first long ride, and this advice was awesome and helpful, maybe it will help you too. Good luck homey!
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Any tips on how to ride distance on CBR?


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.