Riding Skills Want to improve your skills on or off the track?

sitting back from the tank

  #1  
Old 06-01-2011, 08:53 PM
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Default sitting back from the tank

everything i have heard about sport bikes says that you want as much weight forward on the bike. meaning sit right up against the tank. i never had a problem with this on my F1 but on my F2 i'm most comfortable cornering if i sit back about 2 inches from the tank. i go from being all stiff on the bike when i'm close to the tank. to being able to just lean and corner without any thought all seemingly based on my seating position.


i'm a making any sense?
 
  #2  
Old 06-01-2011, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by secretdestroyers View Post
everything i have heard about sport bikes says that you want as much weight forward on the bike. meaning sit right up against the tank. i never had a problem with this on my F1 but on my F2 i'm most comfortable cornering if i sit back about 2 inches from the tank. i go from being all stiff on the bike when i'm close to the tank. to being able to just lean and corner without any thought all seemingly based on my seating position.


i'm a making any sense?
Don't think it's a F1 vs F2 thing. This is from Sport Riding Technique: How to Develop Real World Skills for Speed, Safety and Confidence on the Street and Track by Nick Ienatsch
Sitting too far from the tank locks the elbows and that means you lose front end feel. Straight arms often feed wobbles and weaves into the bike's chassis because the front tire isn't being allowed to respond to imperfections in the road.

Sitting up against the fuel tank puts the rider's belly against the tank and often straightens the back. As soon as the back goes straight, the arms do too. The inevitable results are the loss of front-end feel, abrupt inputs and a lack of smoothness. Riders who sit too close to the tank often find themselves locked in position, losing the ability to move their shoulders to help load the foot pegs or transfer weight forward and rearward

Ideally, your crotch should be about one inch from the back of the tank, your back slightly rounded and your arms bent. In this sport, the keys to success are precise operation of your throttle and front brake lever and your ability to steer and shift, so relaxed hands are mandatory. Relaxed hands begin with your seating position
There are illustrations as well to provide visual examples. And to give you an idea how important that is, that's on page 18 of the book. I'd recommend picking up the book. It's an excellent read... And I ain't typing the whole thing out for you

Oh and I'm moving this to Riding Skills as it's really about proper positioning. Which isn't bike specific.
 
  #3  
Old 06-01-2011, 11:45 PM
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Yes, you are making sense.

BTW, good reference Kuro.

While proper body positioning is indeed important, it also needs to be intuitive. I believe the quote indicates this by remarking on the need to be relaxed. You are relaxed by being confident & letting the bike move beneath you, w/o you being stiff-armed & over-controlling. When you're confident, you're relaxed & body positioning will come naturally.

By "relaxed", I don't mean lazy...I mean properly positioned w/o having to consciously think about it every moment you're on the bike. You'll be able to let the bike move while you respond & make corrections in such a way as its completely natural. You & the bike operate as one system.

Body positioning has changed a lot over the decades by sport bike racers. In fact, many champions of the past would say their respective styles are antiquated compared to today's racers...yet, they were comfortable & confident on their bikes, winning championships w/ their own styles.

If you're back a little more from the tank, don't worry about it. If you're relaxed & in control, & the bike is getting proper control inputs from you, all is good.

Point is, given what is recommended for proper positioning to maximize optimum control & response, make it your own w/ adjustments as necessary.
 
  #4  
Old 06-02-2011, 12:23 AM
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Originally Posted by gotcbr View Post
...
Point is, given what is recommended for proper positioning to maximize optimum control & response, make it your own w/ adjustments as necessary.
That and remember the bikes were allegedly designed with a 5' 8" rider weighing about 140lb in mind

Meaning, we're all different body sizes so there is some play in where you should be sitting cause of arm length / height / ect
 
  #5  
Old 06-02-2011, 01:24 AM
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Sitting against the tank is the only way I can sit. And womanness in me made me read books and watch DVD, learn how to ride in my head first before learned with body. They said to use your core muscle to hold your body and relax arms. So my arms are almost always relaxed. When you are going moderate speed and has to stop, do you guys shift the weight to more back?
 
  #6  
Old 06-02-2011, 03:23 AM
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During hard braking, you should keep your weight back, and squeeze the tank with your knees to keep back. This is to keep from doing an endo. And you squeeze the tank rather than lock your arms, because you always want your arms as relaxed as possible to make steering, throttle, and braking inputs easier and more precise.
 
  #7  
Old 06-02-2011, 11:47 AM
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Only way the I can shift the weight to the back is by pushing the arms on the handle bar as I brake and push the body back. I don't think it is a good way. How do you do it?
 
  #8  
Old 06-02-2011, 05:29 PM
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thanks gotcbr and kuro. you were both helpful , think i might have to get that book.

SD
 
  #9  
Old 06-02-2011, 05:51 PM
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Total Control is a decent read as well. I've got over 80k miles under me but I still go back and skim through to refresh/reinforce my grasp of the basics.

The other 'bible' on motorcycle skills is Keith Code's, "Twist of the Wrist". Code's book is more race-track oriented, but riding is riding to a certain extent. Street riding just has a few extra problem sets that racer's don't endure.

Haven't read Nick Ienatsch's book. That's gonna change though. Been reading his stuff for a long time, didn't know he had a book. He's a serious bad-*** on a bike. Raced a lot of 250's back in the day.

Ern
 
  #10  
Old 06-02-2011, 07:00 PM
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Huh. I must have sloppy riding position.

What I used to do was sit at a stoplight right up against the tank. When I'd take off I'd kind of slide back until my butt was all the way back against the rear seat (I have an 01, so it's a split seat setup.) I'd stay riding like that until I started braking for another stoplight, then I'd slide back up until I was against the tank again.

I'm about 6'0, 210, so maybe it's a height thing? With my stompgrip coming I won't be able to slide back and forth very easily anymore, so I'll have to develop new riding posture anyway. I'll have to try the 1" back approach when I get back on the road.
 

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