Riding Skills Want to improve your skills on or off the track?

Learning to ride.

  #1  
Old 03-12-2014, 08:38 AM
MissBiBi1's Avatar
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 22
Default Learning to ride.

Hello my CBR family!

I purchased my 2006 CBR 600 F4i last week. It needed a new ignition so the guy who I purchased the bike from ordered the part and it was changed yesterday. So since I bought the bike I haven't rode it until yesterday. Mind you I never rode a bike before. I know I should have bought a 250 as a starter bike but everyone told me that it will be a waste of money because I will get bored easily. I'm take my BRC class on the 24th so I'm really excited about that! As I was trying to learn a little bit yesterday in the parking lot I got a little frustrated. I know I need to work on my balancing and keeping the handle bars straight. I just wished that I got the hang of it naturally. I guess I'm just venting right now, I'm sorry. I only stayed on first gear yesterday and then just stopped. I thought it was going to a little easy since I know how to drive a manual, and that's what my first car was.

Well I'm done venting, sorry if I bored you. I WILL LEARN HOW TO RIDE SOON!!!!!

BTW any tips will be very helpful thanks!Name:  MYBIKE.jpg
Views: 16
Size:  56.0 KB
 
  #2  
Old 03-12-2014, 10:52 AM
Conrice's Avatar
Retired Super Moderator and Fighterer
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 6,148
Default

The best tip is to take your time and have fun doing it.

I do think that riding one of the little 250's at the BRC is going to help you a lot. They're easier to manipulate (because they are narrow and low to the ground) and nowhere near as sensitive to throttle inputs. But I don't think you've started out with "too much bike". You'll have 2 days on that little 250, it'll let you feel how riding something with 2 wheels and a motor is supposed to feel like, and then you can apply it to your F4i.

Keep doing what you're doing. You can do it. Millions of people do this every single day. Just take your time, don't get frustrated, and have fun!

It is easier for you though. You at least understand the concepts of a clutch, it's just now you have to do it with your hand.

Make sure your controls are set up for your hands (and feet). For example, my wife has teeny tiny hands (XS gloves) whereas I have huge hands (3XL gloves). She can't ride my bike without adjusting the levers and the same goes for me when I ride hers. If the bike feels a little too tall, maybe you can lower it a tad by the front forks... It's amazing what an extra 1/4 inch can do to make you feel like you have more control over it (if it's an issue). That'd put you on the ***** of your feet as opposed to tippy toes for example.
 

Last edited by Conrice; 03-12-2014 at 10:59 AM.
  #3  
Old 03-12-2014, 11:04 AM
hawkwind's Avatar
September 2009 ROTM Winner - Faster than a Speeding ..........
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 3,808
Default

Take the advice offered by Conrice.

Most important enjoy the process of learning and the progress you make.

Take your time, don't try to force things, you'll learn best at your own pace.

Muscle memory will kick in after some practice and the gear changes and clutch control with your hands and feet will start to feel natural.

Oh and BTW welcome to the forum and the biking world
 
  #4  
Old 03-12-2014, 11:40 AM
Senior Member
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 129
Default

Here is a technique I learned from the MSF. Getting used to starting/taking off and learning balance. Go someplace with open space. Get used to letting out the clutch smoothly and getting the bike to roll. Once you get it rolling completely disengage the clutch and let the bike roll foward on it's on, walk it if you need to and eventually you want to just let the bike roll foward and keep it straight. This will give you confidence in balancing the bike and keeping the bars straight. Most importantly remember these two things Never grab the front brake very hard you will go down and as a beginner no braking in the turn. Prepare for the turn in advance and go the proper speed. dont try flying into the turn and jamming on the brakes.

Be safe & ride within your limits. It's better to learn slow than to get hurt and quit ;-)
 
  #5  
Old 03-12-2014, 03:54 PM
MissBiBi1's Avatar
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 22
Default

Thank you all for your tips and advice!! I really appreciate it, I will take it day by day. I really don't want to push my self and next thing you know I fall Thanks you guys!
 
  #6  
Old 03-12-2014, 04:22 PM
Conrice's Avatar
Retired Super Moderator and Fighterer
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 6,148
Default

Originally Posted by MissBiBi1 View Post
Thank you all for your tips and advice!! I really appreciate it, I will take it day by day. I really don't want to push my self and next thing you know I fall Thanks you guys!
It's when, not if. We've all been there. I hope you don't drop it, but you might. It's important to remember that while it's embarrassing - most have done it - don't sweat it I dropped my bike on the first day pulling into a parking spot, it sounds like you've already beat me!

I was on the brakes when the forks were turned - I started to get off balance - grabbed the brakes harder - then the forks turned even more - I was more off balance - and before I knew it, I was trying to pick it up with my friends laughing at me!

It happens. What part of FL are you from?
 
  #7  
Old 03-12-2014, 04:23 PM
74demon's Avatar
Administrator and MVN, March 2012/Oct 2013 ROTM
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: socal 949/951
Posts: 7,679
Default

Seat time is important, and lots of it. Once you get the basics down, ride EVERYWHERE. The more time you spend in the saddle, the easier it will be. Even after many, many years of riding, it still takes me some miles to "get a feel for it" if I've taken a few weeks off. When I'm riding daily, the bike becomes just another part of me.

Learn to fight the natural tendencies to do the completely wrong thing in a panic situation. You will learn to react correctly by instinct, in time. Remember, the bike is capable of doing things well beyond most of our abilities. It's our bad inputs that creates the problems.

Have fun.


And.....wear your gear! ALWAYS. Even if your only going down the street. I've seen people wreck at the end of their driveway. A friend of mine (very experienced rider) was killed less than a mile from the house. Point is, things can happen anywhere, at anytime, to anyone.
 

Last edited by 74demon; 03-12-2014 at 05:32 PM.
  #8  
Old 03-12-2014, 05:19 PM
Sebastionbear's Avatar
Super Moderator / Welcome Crew Test Pilot, VIN & ROTM Sept 2012, Kiwi Translation Specialist.
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Adelaide Hills, Sth Aussie.
Posts: 4,550
Default

+ seventy eleven gazillion for Demon's post!


Also if you have a friend who has ridden for a while, get them to follow you when you venture onto the road and they should offer support and constructive criticism.

It's good to ride with a buddy to start with.

Good luck with it and..............

practice, practice, practice with ALL the safety gear on.

You will get the hang of it, and then getting rid of the smile will be the hard part.

Cheers, SB
 
  #9  
Old 03-13-2014, 12:47 PM
MissBiBi1's Avatar
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 22
Default

Originally Posted by Conrice View Post
It's when, not if. We've all been there. I hope you don't drop it, but you might. It's important to remember that while it's embarrassing - most have done it - don't sweat it I dropped my bike on the first day pulling into a parking spot, it sounds like you've already beat me!

I was on the brakes when the forks were turned - I started to get off balance - grabbed the brakes harder - then the forks turned even more - I was more off balance - and before I knew it, I was trying to pick it up with my friends laughing at me!

It happens. What part of FL are you from?

I live in Jacksonville FL
 
  #10  
Old 03-13-2014, 12:48 PM
MissBiBi1's Avatar
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 22
Default

Originally Posted by Sebastionbear View Post
+ seventy eleven gazillion for Demon's post!


Also if you have a friend who has ridden for a while, get them to follow you when you venture onto the road and they should offer support and constructive criticism.

It's good to ride with a buddy to start with.

Good luck with it and..............

practice, practice, practice with ALL the safety gear on.

You will get the hang of it, and then getting rid of the smile will be the hard part.

Cheers, SB
I'm searching around for a good jacket as we speak. I already got my boots, helmet, and gloves. Just need a good jacket.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Learning to ride.


Advertising
Featured Sponsors
Vendor Directory

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.