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carrying a passenger

  #1  
Old 07-04-2011, 05:03 PM
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Default carrying a passenger

So I've been riding for literally about a month now, I bought the bike on my birthday June 5 and this is my first bike ever. I did take a MSF its called ride Chicago. Yesterday I was with the wifey and she wanted to get on. Now, I was a bit nervous but I said *** it and let her get on. I went just down the alley and man I felt so weird. It didn't feel right with her on. I mean she was more nervous than I was but I didn't want to let her know I was nervous. The turns felt weird as well. Maybe it was because my dumb self let her get on with her wearing a skirt that it wasn't a bright idea. So we just went around the block the entire time in second gear. And I just don't know, what key elements are there when carrying a passenger? What changes? I'm probably the biggest noob on here right now lol. But she keeps nagging and nagging to ride with me. Can you guys help me out??
 
  #2  
Old 07-04-2011, 05:27 PM
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the closer they are to you the easier it is to turn and manouver.
Tell them to lean with you and not away in the corners.
Make sure they don't change posistions as you are going around a corner or rolling up to a stop.
With experience it will get easier.
Change your rear suspension to make up for the extra weight so it doesnt bottom out.
 
  #3  
Old 07-04-2011, 05:32 PM
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Tell her to:
Keep her feet square on pegs at all times.
Keep her crotch and chest as close to your back as possible.
Keep her body in line with yours (leaning when you lean, to the same degree!).

If she is not tall enough to see over your head, tell her to NOT try to lean to see around you or tip her head for a better view.

Practice makes perfect, just take it easy and you will get used to it in no time. She is doing the riding as well and has to learn, don't forget that!
 
  #4  
Old 07-04-2011, 05:37 PM
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Thanks guys!! Another question I have is how long did most of you wait until you thought you were ready to have someone ride with you? Is one month to soon? Or is it based on the riders comfort level. I mean I was pretty comfortable, up until it actually happened.
 
  #5  
Old 07-04-2011, 05:56 PM
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If you've only been riding a total of a month, I don't want to sound harsh but you shouldn't be 2-upping. You still haven't developed the skill/reflexes to assure your safety, so you definitely can't ride safely with her added to the equation.

Two-up is like learning to ride all over again. Everything is different. Longer stops, slower handling due to higher center of gravity, suspension has less travel and is harsher, slower acceleration, more prone too wheelying. Slow speeds are really fumbly and it's real easy to dump the bike.

I'm NOT saying, never consider it. I AM saying, get your skill level and confidence up to the task. As a general rule, I would advise you to get 2 or 3 thousand miles under you, then start to slowly explore 2-up. You need feel comfortable about shifting, starting and stopping solo, before you take it to the next level.

Something I like to tell people about any task with inherent hazard to it, "If it doesn't feel comfortable, it's NOT SAFE!". You obviously, from the tone of your post, didn't feel comfortable. Listen to your gut.

Ern
 
  #6  
Old 07-04-2011, 07:05 PM
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Yea, I've only been riding for a month. Damn I feel more wiser now that I have this info. The slow stops as you said were a bit wobbly. Thanks for the gelp
 
  #7  
Old 07-04-2011, 07:06 PM
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Yea, I've only been riding for a month. Damn I feel more wiser now that I have this info. The slow stops as you said were a bit wobbly. Thanks for the help guys!! If you got more advice keep it coming!!!
 
  #8  
Old 07-04-2011, 07:38 PM
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Here is a very informative site. the guy has survived into old age and has a lot of good info for beginners. Motorcycle Info and Accessories

Cruise the new rider section for a lot of tips on beginning to build your skill set. Do a search of Kurisho's posts in there, he's a very level-headed, thoughtful advisor on all things bike. (All the rest of you guys and gals, no flames for not mentioning you! lol)

Ern
 
  #9  
Old 07-04-2011, 09:45 PM
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sometimes i find it better to tell them to look over your inside shoulder when you turn. some people over do the lean and then it messes you up more and when you lean they lean to look over your shoulder just the right amount. it just takes some time to get used to. I found for breaking to a stop for a light or sign it is best to break normally but when you are all most to a stop then switch to the rear break. it is harder to keep the bike in a straight line when you have a passanger and you can not expect their movements or weight and using the front break when coming to a complete stop with a not perfectly balanced bike makes it feel wabbly.
 
  #10  
Old 07-05-2011, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by karl10250 View Post
sometimes i find it better to tell them to look over your inside shoulder when you turn. some people over do the lean and then it messes you up more.
Agree. You want the passenger to be as neutral as possible.

And to the original poster - you should get your suspension checked and set up properly, whether or not you're going to be carrying a passenger.
 

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