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Spark Plug Change Questions

  #1  
Old 04-02-2012, 11:09 AM
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Default Spark Plug Change Questions

I've been slowly going through the bike since I acquired it and now it's time for plugs. First time for me on this bike so I have some questions for the forum and to confirm my knowledge. I have the general info on torque values/tightening/plug # from the manual. Bike is an 02 with 17K miles and is stock with the exception of a Yoshi slip-on.

1. Aluminium head/threads so you want the engine to be absolutely cold.
2. Is it easier to remove the airbox for access then the radiator? Can this be done?
3. Blow out plug recess with air before removing.
4. Finger install and initial tighten to avoid crossthreading.
5. Do you leave threads dry, apply oil or anti-seize?
6. Manual says not to regap plug.
7. Di-electric grease on the plug wire contacts.

Anything I'm missing or should be aware of? Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 04-02-2012, 11:20 AM
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tip: push a few inches of vacuum hose over the top of the plug. then twist the hose to start the plug.

i've always dropped the radiator to do plugs, but some have gone from the top.
a little anti seize never hurts.
DO NOT GAP THE PLUGS.
 
  #3  
Old 04-02-2012, 11:38 AM
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Anti-seize is a great thing, except on spark plugs!! (NGKs to be exact) which is the only plug you should use on these bikes.
NGKs are already shell "coated" from he factory.

See link of plug damage from using Anti-Seize.
http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/TB-...1antisieze.pdf
 

Last edited by Sick97SS; 04-02-2012 at 11:58 AM.
  #4  
Old 04-02-2012, 11:45 AM
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Hi there!

I just did plugs last week on my 02 F4i @ 13k miles. I used the spark plug tool from the tool kit and the small wrench from the tool kit to turn the spark plug too.

I went it from the top, moving the gas tank, air filter, air filter box. I did it this way because I had to replace the air filter. Also, while I was at it I replaced the fuel pressure regulator and the chain tensioner, because I had everything apart and they were cheap parts.

1. Aluminium head/threads so you want the engine to be absolutely cold.
Correct.
2. Is it easier to remove the airbox for access then the radiator? Can this be done?
I removed the airbox, if you come in from the top you do not need to remove the radiator at all.
3. Blow out plug recess with air before removing.
I did not do this, the holes were clean. Any dirt that gets in there will get burnt up and spit out the exhaust anyways.
4. Finger install and initial tighten to avoid crossthreading.
I "finger" installed by putting the plugs into the OEM Spark Plug tool that is in the kit with the bike tools and put it down and started it that way.
5. Do you leave threads dry, apply oil or anti-seize?
I put a small amount of Anti Seize on the threads.
6. Manual says not to regap plug.
I bought the same OEM plugs and they were the same gap as what came factory in the bike.
7. Di-electric grease on the plug wire contacts.
I put di-electric grease on the top of the plugs, before I put them in the spark plug too. The OEM plugs didn't have any on them when I removed them and the tops of the plugs were clean (no corrosion).
 
  #5  
Old 04-02-2012, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Sick97SS View Post
Anti-seize is a great thing, except on spark plugs!! (NGKs to be excact) which is the only plug you should use on these bikes.
NGKs are already shell "coated" from he factory.

See link of plug damage from using Anti-Seize.
http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/TB-...1antisieze.pdf
Wow, thanks for that! You learn something everyday!

I have used Anti Seize on the threads of all of my plugs that I have put in cars/motorcycles and never had an issue, however I never crank them down so hard that I would break them.
 
  #6  
Old 04-02-2012, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Sick97SS View Post
Anti-seize is a great thing, except on spark plugs!! (NGKs to be exact) which is the only plug you should use on these bikes.
NGKs are already shell "coated" from he factory.

See link of plug damage from using Anti-Seize.
http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/TB-...1antisieze.pdf
Excellent info, thanks. Like Skizzels, I've developed an near and dear relationship with antisieze over the years. You're never to old to learn something new!

Originally Posted by 74demon View Post
tip: push a few inches of vacuum hose over the top of the plug. then twist the hose to start the plug.
Nice trick, thanks. Great for those of us with fat fingers.

Any thoughts on which is easier or preferred; accessing through the radiator or air box?
 
  #7  
Old 04-02-2012, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Incompatible View Post
Any thoughts on which is easier or preferred; accessing through the radiator or air box?
I can only comment that there was tons of room with the tank off (being held up by bungie cords). I did not try the radiator way, as I was taking the tank off anyways.

Make sure you wear some gloves and have patience...and remember what screws go where. There are some washers on the top and bottom of the small bolts on the top of the tank that can fall off and get caught in the radiator, make sure you grab them.

A long magnet extendable "pen" worked wonders!
 
  #8  
Old 04-02-2012, 06:34 PM
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Blowing out the holes is a smart move before pulling the old plugs, unless you want dirt in your engine.

That bit about the anti seize is good to know, wish I knew that when I did the plugs in my truck.

I think the bit about not regaping is due to the plug design w/ the platinum disc welded to the ground so you don't screw it up, though I'm not sure how you could.

I'm at about 19k on my stock plugs, about time to do them and check the valves. Post some pics of how your old plugs look OP.
 
  #9  
Old 04-02-2012, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by chambers View Post
I think the bit about not regaping is due to the plug design w/ the platinum disc welded to the ground so you don't screw it up, though I'm not sure how you could.
platinum plugs have a tip that is a fine wire. attempting to gap them can and probably will break the plug tip. they are very, very fragile.
 
  #10  
Old 04-02-2012, 07:32 PM
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I was talking about the platinum disc welded on the ground, but the iridium tip on these plugs is very fine so I can see how it could get messed up. Learn something new every day.
 

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