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Probably nothing, new rear pads question

  #1  
Old 09-26-2011, 11:41 PM
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Default Probably nothing, new rear pads question

So this past weekend i got around to installing my new EBC HH brake pads. Due to my dad claiming that it was an idiotically simple process i didn't bother researching a how to, but mentioned to him the few things i read required rear tire removal. He insisted we could, most simply, remove the rear caliper and change them once it is loose from the hub. Consequentially the pads weren't set on the mounting bracket correctly and were (unknowingly) grinding against my wheel a good bit (maybe 2mi. total driving). My dad insisted it was the pad being new and (i) we soon decided this could not be correct due to the resistance being given without braking and the lack of braking force when the pedal was pressed. Anyways, once we got it mounted i noticed two things that i had a question about: 1. There is a nice, almost complete, silver ring now where the corner of the inner pad was scraping a gouge into the wheel. Is there an easy way to repaint this so i don't look like a noob that doesn't know how to install new brake pads (which is exactly what i am)? I was thinking sharpie or nail polish, but i'd like something permanent that's not noticeable. 2. The rotor seems to be getting very warm, even after very short trips. Will this occur with any new pads during the brake-in period or is my caliper malfunction? It doesn't seem to be actually applying any braking force with the clutch in.

PS any tips on scratch removal? i'm the kind of person that worries about every new scratch, i like to keep my vehicles as pristine and clean as i can, however i almost always end up with a new scratch after working on my bike. any way to repair or get around this (besides learning, and being more careful) or should i just take it as being one of the natures of the beast and wait until i care enough to get new/repainted plastics (ps the tail fairing removal could drive a guy crazy, if mine wasn't cracked already when i got the bike i'd have done it multiple times by now)?

PPS sorry for being so wordy
 
  #2  
Old 09-27-2011, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by nubbiecakes View Post
2. The rotor seems to be getting very warm, even after very short trips. Will this occur with any new pads during the brake-in period or is my caliper malfunction? It doesn't seem to be actually applying any braking force with the clutch in.

PS any tips on scratch removal? i'm the kind of person that worries about every new scratch, i like to keep my vehicles as pristine and clean as i can, however i almost always end up with a new scratch after working on my bike. any way to repair or get around this (besides learning, and being more careful) or should i just take it as being one of the natures of the beast and wait until i care enough to get new/repainted plastics (ps the tail fairing removal could drive a guy crazy, if mine wasn't cracked already when i got the bike i'd have done it multiple times by now)?

Solutions to the big wheel scratch are as follows:

Paint the scratch - it will look a bit ****
Paint the whole wheel - will look good if done well
Get the wheel powder coated - will look good and will be more hard wearing than paint, costs more though.
Live with it - this is what I would do.



As for the brake caliper getting hot:

Get the rear wheel off the ground and rotate it by hand, the pads should drag a small amount on the disc but not enough to make it hard to turn and it should be fairly quiet. If it is loud and or hard to turn then your caliper is binding. A small amount of drag is perfectly normal. Go for a ride and don't use your rear brake, after a while get off and feel if the disc is hot, warm is ok, hot is bad and suggests the pads are dragging too much, this wears down the pads, warps discs and costs you power and fuel.

The solution to a binding caliper is as follows:
Remove the caliper, clean up and copper grease the pad sliding pins, if they are worn or corroded then get new ones.
Remove the rubber boots from the caliper sliding pins, clean out the holes, boots and pins and put in plenty of fresh grease.
Pump out the piston a small way to reveal the ring of grime that builds up with use, scrub this off using a toothbrush and brake cleaner.

At this point I would reassemble, go for a short ride and try spinning the wheel again once it had cooled down, if it was still binding then I would pump out and remove the pistons, remove the seals and clean them up, clean out the seal grooves, refit everything and rebleed. This is a bit of a pain in the **** though so I would do the simpler stuff first.




As for scratches on the painted surfaces, shallow scratches can be removed with rubbing compound, if they do T cut in the US then that is the best I have come across. It basically removes a layer of paint until the scratch is gone. Deep scratches will need to be filled out and touched up or if really bad the whole panel resprayed. I quite like the look of my battle scars though so have left them alone.
 
  #3  
Old 10-04-2011, 05:56 PM
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Thanks for the advice! I'll take it all into consideration.
 
  #4  
Old 10-04-2011, 06:58 PM
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LOL your dad sounds like Tim the Tool Man. I'm having a hard time picturing how the brake pad managed to contact the wheel directly?

I read somewhere that thin scratches on the body can be filled in with a syringe full of touch up paint and then buffed smooth. As for the wheel, powder coating is the way to go as DonnyBrago suggested.
 
  #5  
Old 10-04-2011, 07:40 PM
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Good idea, and yeah, he isn't far off from Tim Taylor... if he ever actually finished any of his projects
 
  #6  
Old 10-04-2011, 08:54 PM
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Donnie's got the straight scoop here. +1

Your dad is correct in pulling the caliper, not the wheel. The rest of it, listen to Donnie.
Also, it would be a good idea to flush and re-fill and then bleed the brake fluid as
part of the maintenance of brake-pad replacement.

Good luck, Ern

P.S. No mater how simple it appears to be, do the leg-work! Research and find a
couple of different inputs on proper procedure and technique. It helps to anticipate
ALL the parts and tools you will need to make it a smooth job.
 
  #7  
Old 10-04-2011, 09:25 PM
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Heres one i made hope it will help

Rear Brake Service on my CBR 600 F4i - YouTube
 
  #8  
Old 10-05-2011, 10:46 AM
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Thanks guys!
 
  #9  
Old 10-05-2011, 10:50 AM
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It's odd...correct me please if I'm wrong...changing rear pad do Not require removal of rear wheels...? Most CBR bikes right?
 
  #10  
Old 10-05-2011, 12:08 PM
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