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Chain adjustment blocks with aftermarket chain?

  #1  
Old 08-06-2010, 02:02 PM
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Default Chain adjustment blocks with aftermarket chain?

I had a new chain put on about 1k mi ago along with new sprockets (-1). I went to adjust the chain the other day and noticed the adjustment blocks are still past replace chain...should the shop have removed a link or something? Should I call them and ask them to correct this or is this part of having an aftermarket chain? It's an RK gold chain...it's my first bike and first time through this stuff, but my first instinct was that it should be corrected by the shop, am I wrong? Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 08-06-2010, 03:05 PM
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Think about it brotha,,,, -1 in the front means a smaller sprocket which means more chain slack. So you have to slide the rear wheel back a tad to compensate.

Basically your chain adjustment indicators are now useless.
 
  #3  
Old 08-06-2010, 05:00 PM
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Or you should have removed a link.
 
  #4  
Old 08-07-2010, 08:30 PM
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You really think that dropping one tooth would make that big of a difference in chain slack? I understand your point and I think you're probably right, but what now? How else do I tell when the chain's at the end of it's life? Just curious what all the other people who went -1 do?
 
  #5  
Old 08-07-2010, 11:37 PM
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Lots of chains come with too many links for stock gearing so your tooth count has nothing to do with it[at this point at least]. When the chain isen't linked together you just wrap it around the sprockets and see ho many links it needs, pretty simple.
 
  #6  
Old 08-08-2010, 12:30 AM
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check for missing orings, tight spots, worn sprockets-thats how you tell its at the end of its life.
 
  #7  
Old 08-09-2010, 09:14 PM
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So glad to see your post. I just did a 520 conversion and went +2 in the bak, when I got it home I looked at the blocks and the indicator was past "replace" and I've been stressing that it was done wrong all day, seems like it's normal .

-Brandon
 
  #8  
Old 08-10-2010, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Resuringu View Post
So glad to see your post. I just did a 520 conversion and went +2 in the bak, when I got it home I looked at the blocks and the indicator was past "replace" and I've been stressing that it was done wrong all day, seems like it's normal .

-Brandon
Again, its NOT normal. Buy your new stuff, put the block to brand new, then decide where to cut the chain before install.
 
  #9  
Old 08-10-2010, 11:07 AM
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I've always installed new sprockets/chains so that it was adjusted all the way in, and had the correct amount of slack at that point, then cut the chain to the right length.

Like boredandstroked said. Its not normal. Your reducing the amount of adjustment for the future, and your lengthening the wheelbase (small I know)
 
  #10  
Old 08-10-2010, 11:25 AM
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Crap, I misunderstood initially. So is this possible to fix short of getting a new chain? I have a DID rivet on chain. Can one or two links be removed?
 

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