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In the Bed of the Truck

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Old 10-11-2014, 10:23 PM
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Default In the Bed of the Truck

Back in July, my wife and I along with another couple spent a couple weeks in N GA, NC, and TN. We trailer'd them up there, which if any of you know me you realize that this was something a little foreign to me. I've never trailer'd a bike somewhere, I always figured they weren't broke. Anyway, it seems I like showing up at our destination fresh and ready to ride.

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So, 2 weeks ago after coming back from a trip to CA, I flew to TX to pick up a truck and drive it back to S. FL.

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Here's the idea. I have a couple of stands that I use in the garage. I put them in the bed of the truck making sure they would fit and how far apart they were from each other. I clamped them together (that's the 2x4), put them on the ground and then put the bikes in them. Just to see if it was possible. Well, it looks like it will work just fine.

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I'd like some input on things I should keep in mind, as well as ideas for strapping down, and suggestions on suitable ramps that would be easy to carry on trips.
 

Last edited by IDoDirt; 10-12-2014 at 07:23 AM.
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Old 10-12-2014, 01:54 PM
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Looks good Bill, I'd just keep an eye on the inner wheel arches, maybe even a bit of padding if they're that close. If you're bolting the stands to the floor of the bed, it might be an idea to fit some Tie-down points as well.
 
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Old 10-12-2014, 02:28 PM
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I've been doing two bikes in the bed for a long time, they fit nicely. Not the greatest pic, but this is my truck with my f4i, my ex's R6, a generator, tire warmers, stands, a 10x10 shade, chairs etc all loaded up on the way to the track.
 
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by boredandstroked View Post
I've been doing two bikes in the bed for a long time, they fit nicely. Not the greatest pic, but this is my truck with my f4i, my ex's R6, a generator, tire warmers, stands, a 10x10 shade, chairs etc all loaded up on the way to the track.
Yea, you're right it's not the best picture, but it shows I'm not the only fool that thinks this way. lol, JK. If you get the opportunity to post more pics, please do. I'd love to see them. I'm fairly certain that my tail gate is not going to shut. The bed is only 6 1/2' and the bikes in the stands are about 6' 9".

I'm not certain how I'm going to attach the stands to the bed, but they will certainly be immobile. Yea tie-downs are on the list of things to acquire. I also have to figure out what ramp I'd use.
 
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Old 10-13-2014, 05:42 AM
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A folding ramp would take up less space. The wider the better for easy loading/unloading, the last thing you want is to drop the bike from a couple of feet off the ground
 
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Old 10-13-2014, 06:39 AM
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I've used trucks so many times, I've loaded a bike every way possible.

There was only one time I loaded a bike using a ramp - and I didn't like it. I prefer to use the landscape and geography to get it done, it's much safer because you have so much more control, you're closer to the ground, the ramp can move too much, etc.

In Fl, all you need is an overflow drainage ditch - or a septic tank in someone's front yard to get the bike in the bed sans ramp. I'm sure on your coast, they're every bit as prevalent as they are over here (right across "the Alley"). You can usually get the tailgate within a foot of the ground if you're using a septic tank or something similar, and a well placed 2x4 will get the job done from there.

I only say this because you need as much room to line everything up correctly when getting 2 bikes into the bed. When you're in TN, SC, and NC - you won't have any problem finding a spot to do the same type of thing to get the bikes unloaded.


Furthermore, 3 men can easily load/unload any sportbike into a truck when you're in a pinch and can't find a good spot.

And you're correct - standard length beds , the tail gate won't close. Once the front wheel is secured in the stand by compressing the forks, you'll want to secure the rear wheels to the side of the truck they're on as the rear of the bikes tend to migrate. 4 ratchet straps (2 for each front), and then maybe 4 pieces of rope for the rear ends and peace-of-mind.

I would drill and then bolt those wheel stands to the bed - once I confirmed they weren't hitting a frame rail, or anything else vital (like a fuel line!). This wouldn't prevent you from taking them out should you need to do so.
 
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Old 10-13-2014, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Conrice View Post
I

There was only one time I loaded a bike using a ramp - and I didn't like it.
Thats because the truck you were using wasn't lowered I bet. It makes loading/unloading so easy!!!!! I run the bike up the almost no angle ramp until I reach the tailgate. I hold the front brake while I step up into the bed, and then just push it all the way foward. Best part is the more weight in the bed, the more I air up the helper bags [standerd leafs+helper bags, static drop height]. The more weight in the back and resulting air pressure in the bags means a softer and softer ride. When fully loaded a cadillac can't touch my rear ride quality.

Idodirt, I'll post some more pics tonight if I can find them. The only reason my tailgate closes is I don't use pitbulls in the bed, I just rachet strap the bikes. I added an eyelet bolt in the middle of the bed floor for the inside bike straps.
 

Last edited by boredandstroked; 10-13-2014 at 03:32 PM.
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Old 10-13-2014, 03:43 PM
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Found one
 
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Old 10-13-2014, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by hawkwind View Post
A folding ramp would take up less space. The wider the better for easy loading/unloading, the last thing you want is to drop the bike from a couple of feet off the ground
I don't even want to go there... not even think about it.

Originally Posted by boredandstroked View Post
Found one
Yes better. Some photo's of how you've got it strapped down would be nice as well.

Thanks everyone for the responses, certainly some food for thought.
 
  #10  
Old 10-21-2014, 02:41 PM
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Only picture I could find of my bike in my Tacoma. I use the rail cleats for front tie downs and I've got d-rings in the rear. I really want to put D-rings up front too. I've got the cheap harbor freight ramps.

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