Starting on a honda cbr600?

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Old 01-13-2014, 09:14 PM
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Default Starting on a honda cbr600?

I am new to sportsbikes I have no riding experience but I was thinking it would be ok to start on a 600 if I kept everything slow. The nearest place that teaches the motorcycle safety course is 3 hours away from where I live. If its not I was thinking about waiting untill the cbr 300 comesout or getting a 250cc. The way the economy is tho, I fear I wont have enough $$$ to get the bigger bike If I buy something now and then want to sell and upgrade later I might not have the ability. I DID plan on eventually taking the motorcycle safety course and some riding lessons tho.
 
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Old 01-14-2014, 09:27 AM
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People will have different opinions on this. Because you are posting in the 600rr thread, I presume you are looking at buying one. In that event, I'd advise against it. These 100+ hp bikes have a wicked power delivery for the untrained wrist. You can get in a lot of trouble very fast. Not to mention the riding position can be very unfriendly to a new rider. I'm not saying you can't learn on an RR (there are people that do), but there are better bikes out there. If you are set on a 600cc bike, look at an older model (f1,f2). They can be found in good shape and very not a lot of money. Still plenty of power, but a manageable power delivery and an easier riding position. Failing that, a 250 or even a (gasp) ninja 500 isn't a bad option.

All that being said, if your worried about the money so bad, maybe motorcycling isn't for you at this time. It can be an expensive passion (trust me!) and maintenance is expensive if you don't do it all yourself.
 
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Old 01-14-2014, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by CorruptFile View Post
People will have different opinions on this. Because you are posting in the 600rr thread, I presume you are looking at buying one. In that event, I'd advise against it. These 100+ hp bikes have a wicked power delivery for the untrained wrist. You can get in a lot of trouble very fast. Not to mention the riding position can be very unfriendly to a new rider. I'm not saying you can't learn on an RR (there are people that do), but there are better bikes out there. If you are set on a 600cc bike, look at an older model (f1,f2). They can be found in good shape and very not a lot of money. Still plenty of power, but a manageable power delivery and an easier riding position. Failing that, a 250 or even a (gasp) ninja 500 isn't a bad option.

All that being said, if your worried about the money so bad, maybe motorcycling isn't for you at this time. It can be an expensive passion (trust me!) and maintenance is expensive if you don't do it all yourself.
+1 I'm learning on a 600 been riding for 6 months now already had one low side from being to careless. If you buy a 600 really really take your time dont rush things. And he's right after buying the bike it wont stop there, gear, maintenance and all types of cosmetics you will want to do. It can be on the pricey side.
 
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Old 01-14-2014, 12:05 PM
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Theres no problem with starting on a 600. Just make sure you're a bit more careful. I like the lower CC bikes too because you can safely let it rip and not worry about wrecking too badly..
 
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Old 01-14-2014, 12:26 PM
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My personal opinion would be start out with the 600 and just don't ride beyond your skill level. Def take a riders course and don't go out riding with those friends that ride like ******** and will try to push you past your limits (you know who they are).

I went through this same debate with myself 8 months ago. Taking into account I was going from a 450whp car to the bike I was afraid I would get bored with the 500 too quickly. I ended up buying a CBR1100xx because I got a crazy good deal but I've been taking it slow and I'm still not completely used to the acceleration but I don't regret my decision.

IMO you can get yourself in trouble just as easily on a small bike because you think it's "safer" and you can push the limits more. On a bigger bike you know you have to be on top of your game at all times and it will force you to ride more cautiously.

Again, just my opinion.
 
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Old 01-14-2014, 03:43 PM
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The name of the game is responsibility. If you are one of those people that likes to test limits and all that then your better off trying to sway that thought process before you get on it. Sure you can get yourself in trouble on a 600, can do the same on a scooter. Most importantly you have to have your safety as number one concerned. But also you dont want to go out and get a bike, then recklessy lay it down and be in a whole not ball park regarding money and health and all of that.

I hear a lot more stories of people talking about how they decided to get a 250 first and within 3-6 months they were looking to upgrade. First they dont get as much money back and dont have as much to put into the 600.

If I were you I would go take the MSF first. They will have a whole slew of 250's (at least) for you to ride and feel.

It just kind of depends what kind of person you are. You may be the type that wants a 250 and can be very content commuting and riding that for a long time. You know you better than anyone else so you just need to get educated and take in as much information as you can before you buy. Research everything.

Good luck mate.
 
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Old 01-15-2014, 01:37 AM
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The thing I've told people who ask me is take the msf course, then you can start on a 600 if you want. I personally started on an F4 but this was after taking the msf to get the basics down. I probably would have still started on a 600 had I not taken the course but thinking back on it i'm afraid I may have gone down once or twice if I hadn't due to not having the beginner knowledge and instruction. But as everyone said if you do plan on starting on a 600 just take it slow, don't get ahead of yourself.
 
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Old 01-16-2014, 07:38 PM
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i learned on a 600f4i, brand spanking new.

it is a steep learning curve, and you have to be completely in control of your urge to twist that throttle, or you will get in trouble.

i crashed twice. i learned a lot from each crash

i WOULD NOT recommend going with a brand new bike for your first. as they say:

there are two types of riders: those who have crashed, and those who will crash
so get yourself a nice, used one so you wont feel so bad when you drop it. because you will. just be careful and wear ATGATT, and you wont hurt yourself in the process.

 
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Old 01-16-2014, 08:13 PM
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I'm doing exactly what MistahJuice suggested, I've never been on a motorcycle before, and I haven't ridden so much as a bicycle in about 10 years.

Last month I got a 2009 CBR600RR in a trade, after being interested in bikes for a few years. I cruised around the block a few times with it, but didn't feel very comfortable going further than that.

Last Weekend I took the MSF class; afterwards I feel comfortable on the bike - we learned on 12hp Kawasaki's with front controls, so it's a different feeling getting on a Sportsbike with 10x the power, but after about 10 hours of riding around across a Weekend, with instruction, I feel comfortable.

Now it's about developing skill over time.
 
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Old 01-30-2014, 01:47 AM
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I started on the F4i so I'm not going to tell you not to start on a 600. However, the best way to take it slow is on a slower bike. The temptation to go fast before you're ready is ridiculous. I also think a smaller bike will help you become a better rider more quickly than learning on a larger machine that you're trying hard not to upset.

Oh and don't take the safety course eventually, take it now. Preferably before you ever buy a bike. After that, the more training you decide to do the better. Good luck
 

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