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What do you do? #1

  #1  
Old 05-26-2012, 08:13 PM
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Default What do you do? #1

Im gonna try something different. I'm going to give a scenario and ask "what do yo do?'. See the problem is by nature if we don't know what to do in a situation, we generally tend to respond instinctually. And a lot of times, our instincts are wrong. Potentially dead wrong.

So this one happened today. I was riding in unfamiliar territory and took a freeway exit. The warning sign suggested a speed of 25 MPH. I was going about 45 - 50 MPH. My line selection wasn't the best. But it would have been adequate... if the turn was the length I expected. It was not.

So I'm running hot and, with no exit point in sight, I'm gonna run wide. Wide as in "not another curb!!!". And I was at maximum lean (at least mentally).

So how do you correct this situation? Obviously I didn't hit the curb. I'll let y'all know what I did after a few responses. And no, I didn't lean harder cause mentally I was maxed out.
 
  #2  
Old 05-26-2012, 09:02 PM
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Add some counter steer?
 
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Old 05-26-2012, 10:41 PM
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Brake?
 
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Old 05-26-2012, 11:32 PM
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Either trail brake or believe it or not, get harder on the gas loading the rear tire, changing the center of gravity on the bike and forcing the bike to sharpen its' turning radius.

Of course, and I'm not trying to be a dick, but you again seem to have gotten yourself into another classic rookie situation. I'd really really suggest you take a serious bike class, spend some time on a track or park that thing before you run out of lives my friend.

I mean that seriously dude. Sorry.
 
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Old 05-27-2012, 01:32 AM
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Idk....throttle thru and press the inside bar....
 
  #6  
Old 05-27-2012, 02:48 AM
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Do use the suggested speed signs, from my experience driving a truck I know those signs save life’s and are not something to be ignored, but if I did get myself into that situation, I'd probably start trail braking.
 
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Old 05-27-2012, 07:07 AM
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Originally Posted by zaqwert6 View Post
Either trail brake or believe it or not, get harder on the gas loading the rear tire, changing the center of gravity on the bike and forcing the bike to sharpen its' turning radius.

Of course, and I'm not trying to be a dick, but you again seem to have gotten yourself into another classic rookie situation. I'd really really suggest you take a serious bike class, spend some time on a track or park that thing before you run out of lives my friend.

I mean that seriously dude. Sorry.
I disagree. Was just feeling out the changes to suspension I had just gotten done. The only thing I'd term rookie bout it is pushing harder than I should have until I got used to the changes. And yeah, I'm looking into a track school right now

Trail braking is something I wouldn't suggest initially. Its a bit advanced. And for me, it's something I'm still practicing on the BMW. I went a bit simpler in solving the problem:

I tapped the rear brake and stayed on the throttle
 
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Old 05-27-2012, 01:49 PM
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Ya I know....

You went hot, nearly twice the suggested speed, into an unknown and apparently blind turn, on a new bike your clearly not comfortable with yet, that you've already put down in a turn once and nearly totalled, not to mention been struggling with suspension settings AND otherwise, and on the street no less.....

Theres enough beginner mistakes in there to kill someone 2,3 or 4 times. I've lost too many poeple just like this.

I'm fine with you thinking I'm a dick for saying it but I don't want to read about you in the fallen riders forum and live the rest of my life thinking if I said something you'd still be here.

So there I said my peace. Take it for what you will or not, I'll butt out from here on in promise.

Good luck in all you do ,I mean that.
 
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Old 05-27-2012, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by zaqwert6 View Post
Ya I know....

You went hot, nearly twice the suggested speed, into an unknown and apparently blind turn, on a new bike your clearly not comfortable with yet, that you've already put down in a turn once and nearly totalled, not to mention been struggling with suspension settings AND otherwise, and on the street no less.....

Theres enough beginner mistakes in there to kill someone 2,3 or 4 times. I've lost too many poeple just like this.

I'm fine with you thinking I'm a dick for saying it but I don't want to read about you in the fallen riders forum and live the rest of my life thinking if I said something you'd still be here.

So there I said my peace. Take it for what you will or not, I'll butt out from here on in promise.

Good luck in all you do ,I mean that.
No need to butt out. I appreciate the concern and I'll concede it wasn't the smartest thing to do, playing with the unknowns factored in so it's all good.
 
  #10  
Old 05-29-2012, 01:54 AM
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Originally Posted by zaqwert6 View Post
...get harder on the gas loading the rear tire, changing the center of gravity on the bike and forcing the bike to sharpen its' turning radius.
No it won't. More gas WILL shift the CG to the rear, putting more traction to the rear tire while at the same time increasing ground clearance at the front end. The drive forces at the rear wheel will also raise ground clearance at the rear end.

Also more gas means more velocity, which means more traction/lean angle to keep the same radius.

Kuro did the right thing (well, one of them). Using the rear brake while cornering helps scrub speed and tighten the line (reduce radius) with minimal upsetting of the chassis.
 

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