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Tips: Handling the wet

  #1  
Old 05-23-2010, 01:35 AM
Kuroshio's Avatar
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Default Tips: Handling the wet

Got caught in a shower coming back from getting my bike inspected yesterday. That's what ended the season for me last year, riding in the wet. I did learn from last year and used the rear brake the most, adding in front brake after the bike had settled and as needed. Also increased my stopping distance generously, went about 5 under the speed limit and took turns like I was on a stretched 'busa.

No, I wasn't comfortable in the slightest and it wasn't cause I was getting wet (I work outdoors). So any advice on riding in the wet? Because no matter how much we try, eventually we'll get caught in it. Like yesterday, it wasn't supposed to rain until late.

Oh yeah and the exact same spot tried to dump me again: crossin the trolley tracks to pull in & park my bike. Hard to get a good angle coming in so the front tire wants to catch in the track and slide on the wet metal at such a slow speed.
 
  #2  
Old 05-23-2010, 06:32 AM
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Damn buddy sounds a little scarey. I hate sliding around in rain, just be ALOT more cautious, increase braking distance, and be easy on the throttle. And Id try to square up on those trolley tracks if I could be a little less of a hassle. Maybe a rain suit, so your not crazy uncomfortable and aggrevated. hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 05-23-2010, 07:41 AM
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Well, tires with good treading will go a long way. AFAIK, Michelin CT2's have some of the best wet performance available.

The rest is mostly dependent on what you're doing with your hands to maintain weight balance. You just want to be really smooth with all of your inputs and make sure you're not putting too much weight bias towards the front or the rear. If you ever watched guys thrashing it in the rain, you'd be surprised at just how hard you can actually push it when the road's wet.
 
  #4  
Old 05-23-2010, 07:51 AM
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I RIDE in the rain. Not as fast or as hard but I surely dont do 5 under. You'll be surprised at how well your tires still stick its just a matter of vision in the rain. I never ride faster then I can see. After getting caught in the rain all last season I'm pretty good at riding in it. But continue to be and watch the weather channel bro.
 
  #5  
Old 05-23-2010, 08:11 AM
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Easy with that rear too Kuro gentle gears/clutch and move your body to make the bike
lean a bit less will help..... just practice is all ...... builds confidence
 
  #6  
Old 05-23-2010, 08:22 AM
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I eased into the rear brake when stopping. Never locked it up while riding. But I know the front brake will dump me quick. Better to lock the rear and deal with that than have the front drop me faster than I can react
 
  #7  
Old 05-23-2010, 08:27 AM
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seems like ya have it all covered then
 
  #8  
Old 05-23-2010, 10:28 AM
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The day I picked up my F1 I got caught in the rain . . . torrential downpour, 50 kph+ crosswind, bald rear tire, brand new and very slick pavement, and over 200 km from home. Let's just say that the average riding-in-the-rain experience doesn't faze me much after that.

But I still live in fear of loose gravel
 
  #9  
Old 05-23-2010, 12:08 PM
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I ride in the rain all the time. Went out in a thunderstorm yesterday to clean the bike a bit....
The key is just to take everything slowly. Like raylee said, you'd be surprised what you can still do in the rain.

While I agree that the use of the back brake can be beneficial, I still rarely use it. Rear skids are much more controllable, but it's bad when people are out there stabbing at the rear just because it's wet out.
If you're familiar with the feel of your back brake, then fine... but many aren't... and there is a greater chance of locking it, panicking, and then doing stupid stuff that will be more likely to cause you to go down, imo.

Give yourself extra distance, be smooth with the brakes, and shift your weight to keep the bike more upright.
 
  #10  
Old 05-27-2010, 01:35 PM
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I ride in the rain as well, but I don't use the back rake much either. As long as you give yourself ample room to brake, you should be okay. Also remember not to ride as soon as it starts raining. Let it rain for at least 30 minutes or so before you ride. When the water first hits the road, all the oils on it start to rise to the top, so the roads will be slicker. Find a place to chill out for a bit. Even if it is an underpass. But try to stay as far as possible from the road. There are always car drivers losing concentration looking at you on the side of the road who can possibly lose control at any time. Above all, common sense when it comes to being safe should get you home.
 

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