Street Skills Information to keep you from rashing your bike or yourself. Safe riding techniques only please.

Low speed riding

  #1  
Old 03-30-2011, 10:00 PM
Four47Seven's Avatar
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3
Default Low speed riding

I did a quick search and nothing came up so this seems like the thing to do...

Obviously riding at low speeds (less than 25 km/hr or 15-20 mph) is a lot different than riding at higher speeds. The bike feels unstable, counter steering isn't the only way to go, and you can see the scenery. This is something I've never gotten entirely comfortable with. I can do it, but it usually makes me a little nervous.

What makes me particularly nervous is pulling a u-turn in narrow side streets. I've seen 15 foot circles done on youtube and whatnot, but I never figured out how to gain more confidence. I'll usually just end up putting my feet down and walking it around almost straight up with the bars turned .

Is it a matter of just going around a crowded parking lot or is there something I should know that might help me out?

(I watched TotW2 and it seems I pretty much just have to loosen on the handle bars, but there's still 4 inches of snow over here)
 
  #2  
Old 03-30-2011, 10:04 PM
Senior Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Greenville , NC
Posts: 346
Default

When i pull a u turn on a tight street i will always put a foot down to stabilize the bike. Better to be safe than be a show off and lay the bike over. But im sure going to a parking lot will help you practice, but i would wait for the snow to leave. Then watch the sand because you can lose traction on the rear tire and keep the bike up, but when the front tire slips when your turning, your going to have a very personal conversation with the pavement.
 
  #3  
Old 03-30-2011, 10:08 PM
Piranha's Avatar
Senior Member
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 104
Default

Definitely watch out for the sand, usually takes an awhile for the sweepers to get out.
 
  #4  
Old 03-30-2011, 10:17 PM
Four47Seven's Avatar
Junior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3
Default

I always try to avoid anything more than a casual rip around the block before the sweepers have a good week to work (at least). Even then I stick to major roads for almost another month and I still try not to do anything too balsy. I try pretty hard to keep the shiny side up during the start of the 3 month Alberta riding season.
 
  #5  
Old 03-31-2011, 02:21 AM
yumoncbr's Avatar
August 2011 ROTM
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Aloha State
Posts: 1,267
Default

Since I practiced only with slow speed when I first got my bike, I'm comfortable riding at slow speed. However, I am still nervous about doing very tight turn. I try to put my weight on the opposite side and turn the handle bar like how you would do with bicycle, and use back brake, throttle and clutch to control the speed. I don't want to fall, so I rev more white not moving too much. lol I was able to make u turn on 2 lane street one time. If my mind is not up to it, I simply stop and get off and push my bike to angle it in the direction I wanna go. ha ha
 
  #6  
Old 03-31-2011, 03:03 AM
UnderAssumedName's Avatar
Senior Member
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 224
Default

Clutch (at friction zone), some throttle and the rear brake is what keeps you going. Sitting up straight and pushing the bike to the side (one cheek off, to angle it) is what gives you the tighter radius and looking over the shoulder to see where you want to go is what gets you there. Practice makes perfect and you can make the turns tighter once you get better. Mind you, I can't make as tight a turn that I did during the test with my sportbike. I can do it on a naked bike or anything on which I'm more upright though.

Btw, you need a constant engine pull for low speed riding and especially tight turns. If you are in the turn and you pull in the clutch or let go of the throttle etc. The bike is going to drop like a brick.

Have you ever tried taking off and riding (slowly) whilst only using the clutch? Try it.
 
  #7  
Old 03-31-2011, 03:16 AM
yumoncbr's Avatar
August 2011 ROTM
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Aloha State
Posts: 1,267
Default

Originally Posted by UnderAssumedName View Post
Have you ever tried taking off and riding (slowly) whilst only using the clutch? Try it.
Yep, this helps you to get more balance in slow speed
 
  #8  
Old 05-05-2011, 10:04 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 4
Default

Counter steering is out and counter weighing is in. Shift your weight to the outside of your turn and really look where you want to go. Google police motorcycle competition and see what slow speed riding is all about.
 
  #9  
Old 05-19-2011, 11:48 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NH
Posts: 15
Default

didnt u hav to do figure eights in the box? in motorcycle safety class we did all kinds of slow speed tight and wider turns i had to to take the class tho not old enough to get my moto license without it i still sometimes use two parking spots to practice doin a figure eight in, enter in one corner figure eight then exit out the opposite no feet on the ground unless absolutly necassary! the police competitions are absolulty crazy
 
  #10  
Old 05-20-2011, 08:39 AM
Senior Member
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Saint Paul Minnesota
Posts: 731
Default

MSF class they teach you how to ride at slow speeds. The only thing is they don't teach you how to ride a sports bike at slow speeds which is totally different. If you turn the steering wheel to much on a bike bam you go down. Its all about feathering it. Don't worry I think a lot of us either have a hard time or avoid doing sharp turns. Bigger risk of it going down.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Low speed riding


Advertising
Featured Sponsors
Vendor Directory

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.