Street Skills Information to keep you from rashing your bike or yourself. Safe riding techniques only please.

Fear. Irrational Fear.

  #1  
Old 02-05-2013, 09:19 AM
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Default Fear. Irrational Fear.

So I bought a CBRF3 after owning a 2006 600cc shadow for about 9 months. I put 9k miles on it...once I was comfortable riding it I traded it for my CBR heads up.
Now I'm not an extremely experienced rider but I've taken the MSF course, locked up my brakes and didn't drop my bike, taken 4 hour rides to Cape Coral..all on my Shadow.
The CBR scares the dog outta me. It has new tires ( broken in 300 miles), no mechanical issues, clean chain that's lubed... yet I worry over it popping an accidental wheelie or I freeze in a hard brake situation on it where on my Shadow I would have been avoiding the breaking situation because I wasn't worried lol.
I have been riding in my subdivision 3 times, just practicing basic stuff. Still scared. Why am I freaking out considering this isn't my first bike...? Just being a puss?
 
  #2  
Old 02-05-2013, 11:38 AM
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I have an f2, but basically they are pretty much the same bike.

The f2/3 isn`t powerful enough to pop an accidental wheelie without dropping a clutchbomb on it whilst redlining. It has happened to me once and I kind of had it coming cause I accelerated very violently by twisting the throttle wide open and dropping gears in a rapid succession. When I reached what I think was 2. or 1. gear it jumped straight up. Didn`t drop it but got a bit spooked. with just the throttle it simply doesn`t have enough torque.

For the braking thing, there isn`t really nothing else to do than get more miles on it. Last summer was the first for me on a "real" bike and I found myself chickening out a few times in a hard brake situation instinctively trying to put my foot on the ground, which would be the thing to do on a dirt bike, but on an over 200kg street bike, baaad idea. I myself am having a really hard time finding trust that the tires will hold the bike on the road even in a knee-deep bank, I just replaced my front tire last summer and the difference to the old one is enormous. I keep having a fear of loose sand or mud from a tractor`s tires lurking behind that blind bend, but I guess that`what is called a healthy fear, braking BEFORE the turn usually hurts a lot less

Basically the bottom line here would be to find the limits of the bike in a controlled situation and get comfortable around it. To me it gives confidence that I`ve done all the maintenance work myself so I know if there is anything that I should be worried about.

I`ve locked my rear tire a few times, not at all hard, but haven`t managed to lock the front even though I`ve grabbed it pretty hard a few times. I`d guess on a clean, dry asphalt the front brake should be powerful enough to lift the tail up so it WILL stop the bike even by itself, but since you`ve taken the course I assume you`ve been taught using both brakes at the same time as you should.
 
  #3  
Old 02-05-2013, 12:40 PM
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I think there's only two reasons to fear riding a particular bike. Either you don't trust the bike or you don't trust yourself.

It sounds like you don't have a clear idea how the bike handles so you don't trust the bike. You probably just need time on the bike to become familiar with it.

If you are happy that you have the ability to ride the bike then you just need to trust in yourself that you will take it easy while you are learning the bike, then there's nothing to fear.
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-2013, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Optimus_Prime View Post
I think there's only two reasons to fear riding a particular bike. Either you don't trust the bike or you don't trust yourself.

It sounds like you don't have a clear idea how the bike handles so you don't trust the bike. You probably just need time on the bike to become familiar with it.

If you are happy that you have the ability to ride the bike then you just need to trust in yourself that you will take it easy while you are learning the bike, then there's nothing to fear.


More seat time. You need to see that you really do know what you're doing. Take it slow, practice straight line braking and enjoy yourself
 
  #5  
Old 02-05-2013, 01:05 PM
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The different riding position feels foreign to you. As you get more time on the bike, it will feel more natural.
 
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Old 02-05-2013, 01:38 PM
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Sounds to me like an ERC would be a great class for you to get into. It is a one day course that you ride on your own bike. You will re-enforce good habits and learn some of the bike's capabilities in a controlled environment.
 
  #7  
Old 02-05-2013, 07:09 PM
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Sports bikes can be very intimidating.
It's a whole different geometry from a cruiser.
The balance and CG is completely different.

If you aren't completely comfortable yet, give it some miles.
Don't push yourself too hard.
For one your attention is fractured by your misgivings.
So just take her out and let yourself be gradually seduced.

You might try practicing parking lot manuvers.
If you can master slow-speed, the high speed is easy!

Cut some old tennis ***** in half or beer-cans, whatever to make lane-markers.
Or just use parking-lot stripes. Just be sure to avoid storm-drains and slick-spots.

The idea is try out doing figure-8's, roundy-rounds and U-turns,
where there's nothing to run into. Strive to get tighter and tighter.
At extremely slow speeds, throttle control/braking is everything.

Another really good trial is setup a marker, ride towards it at a fixed speed
(30mph is good). As you pass the marker, immediately brake.
Try to stop as quick as you can. Set down a second marker at that point.

Circle back around to the first marker, get back up to your chosen speed.
As you pass it, try to beat the previous distance.
Pay attention to how much force you are using.
Gradually increase that force, if you start to lock up, ease off.
You start stopping shorter and shorter and safely approach the bikes limits.

With time and practice, you will start to impress these skills.
Into muscle memory and confidence.
 
  #8  
Old 02-06-2013, 03:00 AM
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Good tips from everybody! Today I set up a "practice run" on my street... its dead end with just my house. Practiced hard breaking and figure 8s... after doing that for awhile I just seemed to relax a bit. Im gonna commit myself to practice. I remember when I first got my cruiser I lived on a sand road. The VERY first time I road anything else than MSF 250s was on sand. I sucked it up and did it...and didn't fall! I just need to man up and realize the fear is rational, normal, and i just have to fight it.
 
  #9  
Old 02-06-2013, 04:00 AM
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Hatter, that sounds kinda like an ERC.
 
  #10  
Old 02-06-2013, 11:29 AM
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I called my riding couch (who eventually turned out to be my insurance agent) and he is gonna throw me in an empty slot in a class, ARC... pretty much basic skills class but with your own bike for free!
 

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