Riding Skills Want to improve your skills on or off the track?

What should you do? #3

  #1  
Old 07-22-2012, 09:22 AM
Kuroshio's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: West Philly, PA!
Posts: 4,476
Default What should you do? #3

Here's the setup: torrential downpour earlier but it's not raining any more. You're on the highway, taking the exit ramp. And at the bottom of the ramp is deep water, spanning the entire ramp. Based on the cars going thru ahead, it'll go past your rims easily. And obviously you can't turn around since you're on the exit ramp already, coming downhill towards it.

What should you do?
 
  #2  
Old 07-22-2012, 09:27 AM
Kuroshio's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: West Philly, PA!
Posts: 4,476
Default

And do take in account the "coming downhill" part, meaning you'll have extra inertia to deal with. Along with highway speed to shed
 
  #3  
Old 07-22-2012, 11:03 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Conroe,TX
Posts: 91
Default

Get wet.

Slow down but keep steady on the throttle the bike will cut a path thru the water. I unintentionally drove my Magna through water about a foot and a half deep at about 35 mph it pulled my feet off the pegs and scared the crap out of me but the bike stayed steady.

I think a bike in a straight line anyway is better than a car the front tire cuts a path for the rear tire and our tires have a curve that naturally sheds water out to the side unlike a car tire.

Riding in the rain is not that bad on a bike but you do have to pay attention alot more in the turns and when applying the brakes.
 
  #4  
Old 07-22-2012, 12:05 PM
kilgoretrout's Avatar
Administrator - Retired
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: PA, USA
Posts: 8,189
Default

Shed as much speed as you can, keep the bike as vertical as you can, and ride through it.
 
  #5  
Old 07-22-2012, 01:42 PM
MadHattr059's Avatar
Retired Super Moderator - At large E=MC2
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Tulsa,OK
Posts: 2,299
Default

Everyone is pretty much nailing this one. The slower the speed the less chance of
hydroplaning. I will mention, if it's been raining that hard, you can consider the
pavement adhesion as good as dry pavement (assuming quality street tires).

In other words, unless you were already riding like an idiot and the ramp is really short,
you should be able to slow to a walking pace and slow-roll without issue.
 
  #6  
Old 07-22-2012, 03:42 PM
Kuroshio's Avatar
Senior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: West Philly, PA!
Posts: 4,476
Default

Well my concern when I encountered it wasn't so much the water than the cars coming up behind me. I can shed speed faster than they can react on wet pavement. So I did have to take it a little faster than I wanted, rooster tails and all.

But yeah, upright and steady throttle. Pants changing required cause of how much water I threw up
 
  #7  
Old 07-23-2012, 07:26 PM
Dirtrider009's Avatar
Senior Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Elmer NJ
Posts: 130
Default

Originally Posted by Kuroshio View Post
Well my concern when I encountered it wasn't so much the water than the cars coming up behind me. I can shed speed faster than they can react on wet pavement. So I did have to take it a little faster than I wanted, rooster tails and all.

But yeah, upright and steady throttle. Pants changing required cause of how much water I threw up

"Water"
 
  #8  
Old 07-24-2012, 01:21 AM
vfrman's Avatar
Party Animal, ROTM June 2014
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 671
Default

 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Advertising
Featured Sponsors
Vendor Directory

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.