Riding Skills Want to improve your skills on or off the track?

Total Control Advanced Riding Course convo

  #1  
Old 03-13-2012, 12:40 PM
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Default Total Control Advanced Riding Course convo

Hey, so i'm riding a 2001 F4i, and last year i got in my first accident (first in 3 years of riding). I was doing some spirited riding, and working on getting a technique down. Towards the end i was tired, and after a 6 hour ride, i just didn't respond correctly. Other factors like a bad left caliper, and bad brake pads played a huge role. After that accident i was decently intimidated to do some spirited riding, but people kept encouraging me to do a track day to improve my skills.

I'm 23 so buying full leathers, track fairings, boots, gloves, back protector, etc is just financially out of my range. I completed the Pa MSF beginners and Advanced courses, and still felt that i wanted to learn more, so someone suggested me the Lee Parks class called Total Control ARC. I really looked in to it, and was heavily intrigued. More and more this seems a little too perfect. He almost geared his hole class towards the things i want to learn. What a perfect idea, of teaching advanced riding techniques, to non track riders, and even track riders can participate and get a good piece of knowledge from it.

So how many of you haven tried it? I really want to hear negatives because all i hear is how positive everything has been for people that have taken the class. I'm expecting the price coming up, at close to $400, it's no drop in the bucket. Also, location can be an issue, i don't have a location within 3 hours of where i live. So would i ride my bike there? take an 8 hour riding class, and ride home? On an F4i, that sounds like a very painful day.

Here's a link if others are interested in seeing the material i have read, also there's a book on the whole thing, i just picked up the other night, and so far very interesting read.

Total Control Advanced Riding Clinic
 
  #2  
Old 03-13-2012, 05:00 PM
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I might be interested in trying it out. If so, we could prolly go half on a trailer. I checked it out before and figured if I did it, I'd prolly make it an overnighter.

Especially if I took the s1000rr
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-2012, 05:19 PM
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Everything I've heard and read about this guy...He's the real deal. I would love to drop
the change and check out his course.

However, I do want to encourage you to make it more of a priority to get and wear
the gear. For gosh sake's, you aren't a rookie if you've been riding for 3-4 years now.
If you're on a budget, that's cool, we ALL are. But you shouldn't neglect your safety to save a buck. It should be a goal, if not all at once-over time.

One hospital visit, for even a minor road-rash, and you've already spent more than
the cost of the gear. With the gear, is the added bonus, of NOT visiting in the first
place and the weeks of pain, while you're healing. All avoided entirely, while wearing
the right gear.

Start haunting pawn-shops, thrift-stores, and Craiglist for your area. It's an awesome
resource. With a little patience, you can get gear for 25 cents (or less), on the dollar.

I outfitted my wife, in Frank Thomas boots ($40), brand new chaps($55), a pristine,
bomber-jacket ($5), brand-new HJC helmet ($45) and mesh riding-gloves (the only
retail purchase, $20). You're an engineer, you can do the math..Yeah, $165 total.

And she's a girl, it all had to look/fit perfect or..."I'm not wearing that thing!".
It took less than 3 months, to complete the quest.

Hope this helps, be safe, Ern
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-2012, 05:25 PM
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Oh yeah. The other option is the California Superbike School. Higher priced @$650 (iirc) but that includes a s1000rr. And they hit NJ.
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-2012, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Kuroshio View Post
I might be interested in trying it out. If so, we could prolly go half on a trailer. I checked it out before and figured if I did it, I'd prolly make it an overnighter.

Especially if I took the s1000rr


Oh yeah. The other option is the California Superbike School. Higher priced @$650 (iirc) but that includes a s1000rr. And they hit NJ.
Yea, i was thinking the same, about trailering the night before. it start at like 8 am, and they ask you to come 15-30 min early, so i'd have to get ready at 4:30 am to make it there on time, which is ridiculous.

I thought about California Superbike School too, but that's much more track oriented, passing technique, and a lot of those. I've been to NJMP, and i've ridden there and on their track before, i'm not against that idea, but think TC ARC is just more for me, i'm not really 100% confident in doing track as of yet.
 
  #6  
Old 03-13-2012, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by MadHattr059 View Post
Everything I've heard and read about this guy...He's the real deal. I would love to drop
the change and check out his course.

However, I do want to encourage you to make it more of a priority to get and wear
the gear. For gosh sake's, you aren't a rookie if you've been riding for 3-4 years now.
If you're on a budget, that's cool, we ALL are. But you shouldn't neglect your safety to save a buck. It should be a goal, if not all at once-over time.

One hospital visit, for even a minor road-rash, and you've already spent more than
the cost of the gear. With the gear, is the added bonus, of NOT visiting in the first
place and the weeks of pain, while you're healing. All avoided entirely, while wearing
the right gear.

Start haunting pawn-shops, thrift-stores, and Craiglist for your area. It's an awesome
resource. With a little patience, you can get gear for 25 cents (or less), on the dollar.

I outfitted my wife, in Frank Thomas boots ($40), brand new chaps($55), a pristine,
bomber-jacket ($5), brand-new HJC helmet ($45) and mesh riding-gloves (the only
retail purchase, $20). You're an engineer, you can do the math..Yeah, $165 total.

And she's a girl, it all had to look/fit perfect or..."I'm not wearing that thing!".
It took less than 3 months, to complete the quest.

Hope this helps, be safe, Ern


I couldn't agree more, and i've actually already purchased some nice gear. Just bought myself a nice leather jacket, and i'm really liking it.
AGV Sport Topanga Leather Jacket - Street Bike - Motorcycle Superstore

Also looking at grabbing these pants, AGV Sport Willow Leather Pants - Street Bike - Motorcycle Superstore, I already have a nice scorpian helmet, and gloves, all that's left is boots, but i'm not sure if i really need riding boots.

What i was talking about riding gear being expensive for track, is those 1 piece suits, and a lot of that race gear isn't practical for everyday riding. The AGV gear i bought, is much more practical, and i think 2 piece suits are allowed at some tracks, but these are 8" back zippers, which aren't track permitted. Once i'm financially more stable, and can afford a track suit, i'll try the track out. For now i think TC ARC, and what gear i've already purchased, plus pants, would be enough for a year or two.

Thanks for the info!
 
  #7  
Old 03-13-2012, 07:23 PM
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Ahh, I'm glad it's my misunderstanding. I cring when I see all of the kids,
living the dream in shorts and t-shirt. Never realizing good luck isn't forever.

Motorcycle boots are actually a good investment. Statistically, hand and foot injurys
are the most common and severe. Only surpassed by road-rash (A nice name for 3rd
degree burns). A cycle boot protects you from torsion forces and hyper-extension of
the ankle, as well as side-impacts to the ankle and shins. All good things to protect
against.

Glad to know you are protecting yourself, Ern
 
  #8  
Old 03-14-2012, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by MadHattr059 View Post
Ahh, I'm glad it's my misunderstanding. I cring when I see all of the kids,
living the dream in shorts and t-shirt. Never realizing good luck isn't forever.

Motorcycle boots are actually a good investment. Statistically, hand and foot injurys
are the most common and severe. Only surpassed by road-rash (A nice name for 3rd
degree burns). A cycle boot protects you from torsion forces and hyper-extension of
the ankle, as well as side-impacts to the ankle and shins. All good things to protect
against.

Glad to know you are protecting yourself, Ern

Dude, i seriously get that. People online are all about getting their motorcycle license, and getting a bike, and they're all talking about getting gsxr-750, and other supersport type bikes. No one wants to start on a 250 or 500 anymore. That's how bad habits start. Even though i was guilty of putting shorts on for a short ride, i at least matured from that, and was on a 250 following the rules of the road. Hoping the next gen of riders (and i guess my gen too), gets their **** together and grab some gear.

A lot of that actually has a lot to do with why i'm so interested in TC ARC. I feel isn't enough education happening after MSF. I know people that take MSF advanced almost every year, but that really isn't enough. Spirited riding is dangerous, and not something we can pick up at the track. There are skills you can absolutely use from track on the road, but it's just not the same. Different environment variables, and a lot of other differences. Anyways, i'm reading the book right now, and i heavily recommend it. Cost me 7$ shipped from Amazon used books, i'd rather have the Ebook, but haven't gotten around to buying it.
 
  #9  
Old 03-14-2012, 12:37 PM
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i think people would be better off starting on an older bike. if they start on say, a ninja 250, they are used to the good handling that the bike has.

i started on a 1977 suzuki gs750, then moved on to an 81 cb900. those bikes didnt handle worth ****, and i learned a lot on them.
 
  #10  
Old 03-14-2012, 01:25 PM
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Dragondima, I don't have any firsthand feedback for the particular course you asked about, other than hearing good things about it. However, I wanted to tell you to not rule out track days/track day organizations. I don't know what you have avail in Philly but there are several good track day orgs around the country that have good new-track-rider "schools". They have instructor/control riders that help you learn technique & how to safely execute. Each riding session is discussed in a classroom setting w/ your instructor to help you build confidence & get almost instant feedback. You can do your research & find those track day orgs & inquire about their instruction.

I've done many track days w/ these types of new rider instructional classes going on. I've been really impressed w/ the rate in which the new track riders gain valuable skills. Its really amazing to see their confidence level go from timid to excited w/ the proper instruction & positive reinforcement.

Regarding gear: Many track day orgs rent gear. So, you may not have to buy everything. A simple inquiry w/ them will let you know what they provide.

Yes, riding track can get expensive. Sharing the costs w/a fellow rider will decrease the expense. As Kuro mentioned, sharing a trailer (& gas) w/ another rider is good idea. Also, if staying overnight, sharing motel is a good idea to cut costs.

Good luck in your choices.
 

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