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Riding Mishaps: A Teaching Tool by PJ's Parts

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Old 11-27-2013, 01:34 PM
yumoncbr's Avatar
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Default Riding Mishaps: A Teaching Tool by PJ's Parts

Riding Mishaps: A Teaching Tool

Riding Mishaps: A Teaching Tool Over the past decade, weíve identified a trend we donít like. In the fall, just before riding season ends, we see a rash of motorcycle accidents. Weíre not sure if itís because people think their skills have improved exponentially over the summer, or if theyíre trying to cram in some riding before winter comes and they get careless. Either way, most of the end-of-year wrecks we learn about, while unfortunate, are great opportunities for learning and teaching.
Learning from your mistakes is good. Learning from other peopleís mistakes is better. You can make excuses for why it wasnít your fault, but then you miss the opportunity to become a better rider. If you have a mishap and donít take the time to evaluate what happened, itís a wasted experience. And once youíve learned a lesson, you should share it, even at the risk of having people ridicule you for your mistake. You never know who you might help.

Here are some ideas on how to evaluate an incident (after the fact):

Donít try to figure it all out at the scene. Your immediate safety/health is paramount.
Ask witnesses, if there are any, what they saw and heard.
Think about the entire day, not just the moment it happened.
Inspect the motorcycle top to bottom.
Donít automatically blame the other guy if there was someone else involved.
Admit your mistakes. Weíre all human.
Here are some specific things to consider as you think through the event:
Lack of experience/riding above your limits.
Attempting new skills in the wrong environment.
Poor bike maintenance (there are dozens of mechanical possibilities).
Environmental conditions (cold/hot/rain/dark).
Physical preparedness (tired/dehydrated/angry/nervous).
The combination of any or all of the above and more . . .
Every factor is important, so donít jump to conclusions assuming that your mishap was exactly like your buddyís, or that it totally wasnít your fault, or that you just need to get back on the horse and move on. Somewhere on that ride, a limit was exceeded. What that limit was is yours to determine, and yours to share with others so they donít experience the same problem.
The last mishap PJ had was due to fatigue and dehydration. Riding all afternoon in 90 degree weather after six hours of sleep, a cup of coffee, and a Red Bull will mess with your mind. Hello, cracked ribs and a wrecked motorcycle. PJ always reminds our friends to hydrate in advance and throughout a day of riding. Now you know why.

Winter is almost upon us, and spring will be right on its heels with another rash of accidents as people get back in the saddle. We hope you donít, but if you do have a mishap, be pro-active about learning from it so youíre not as likely to have it happen again. Share your newfound knowledge on motorcycle forums, at lunch on a ride, or on social media so you can help others. Itís good motorcycle karma!
 
  #2  
Old 11-28-2013, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by yumoncbr View Post
Riding Mishaps: A Teaching Tool

Riding Mishaps: A Teaching Tool Over the past decade, weíve identified a trend we donít like. In the fall, just before riding season ends, we see a rash of motorcycle accidents. Weíre not sure if itís because people think their skills have improved exponentially over the summer, or if theyíre trying to cram in some riding before winter comes and they get careless. Either way, most of the end-of-year wrecks we learn about, while unfortunate, are great opportunities for learning and teaching.
Learning from your mistakes is good. Learning from other peopleís mistakes is better. You can make excuses for why it wasnít your fault, but then you miss the opportunity to become a better rider. If you have a mishap and donít take the time to evaluate what happened, itís a wasted experience. And once youíve learned a lesson, you should share it, even at the risk of having people ridicule you for your mistake. You never know who you might help.

Here are some ideas on how to evaluate an incident (after the fact):

Donít try to figure it all out at the scene. Your immediate safety/health is paramount.
Ask witnesses, if there are any, what they saw and heard.
Think about the entire day, not just the moment it happened.
Inspect the motorcycle top to bottom.
Donít automatically blame the other guy if there was someone else involved.
Admit your mistakes. Weíre all human.
Here are some specific things to consider as you think through the event:
Lack of experience/riding above your limits.
Attempting new skills in the wrong environment.
Poor bike maintenance (there are dozens of mechanical possibilities).
Environmental conditions (cold/hot/rain/dark).
Physical preparedness (tired/dehydrated/angry/nervous).
The combination of any or all of the above and more . . .
Every factor is important, so donít jump to conclusions assuming that your mishap was exactly like your buddyís, or that it totally wasnít your fault, or that you just need to get back on the horse and move on. Somewhere on that ride, a limit was exceeded. What that limit was is yours to determine, and yours to share with others so they donít experience the same problem.
The last mishap PJ had was due to fatigue and dehydration. Riding all afternoon in 90 degree weather after six hours of sleep, a cup of coffee, and a Red Bull will mess with your mind. Hello, cracked ribs and a wrecked motorcycle. PJ always reminds our friends to hydrate in advance and throughout a day of riding. Now you know why.

Winter is almost upon us, and spring will be right on its heels with another rash of accidents as people get back in the saddle. We hope you donít, but if you do have a mishap, be pro-active about learning from it so youíre not as likely to have it happen again. Share your newfound knowledge on motorcycle forums, at lunch on a ride, or on social media so you can help others. Itís good motorcycle karma!
Really great points here!! I think it is important to figure out what went wrong whenever you have a mishap and you have made a few really great points that may help someone look at the whole picture.

People are too quick to blame others, their bike or the riding conditions when most of the time it comes down to a simple mistake they made that may have been avoided.

Safe riding!!!
 
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