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First time going down :\ ... wet roads.

  #1  
Old 10-08-2011, 09:30 PM
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Default First time going down :\ ... wet roads.

I've only been riding for ~5 months, and there is no way I would consider myself an experienced rider, but I do try to ride as safe as I can.

This is the first time I've went down (F3).
I was parked in a seldom used parking lot, and it had been lightly raining for a few hours. The exit had a very slight dip before it connected to the main road and I'm thinking that allowed oil and whatnot to pool up.

As soon as I hit the dip my rear tire went sliding and the bike lowsided. I managed to jump off the bike and watched it slide a good 20 feet, just missing an oncoming car.

Luckily I wasn't going very fast, and I'd just started wearing full gear a few days ago. I'm no worse for wear, not even as much as a scratch or bruise.
My bike is a little worse off.. clutch lever got bent and won't fully engage now, the shifter is bent, and my left mirror snapped off.

Everyone's told me there are two riders, those who have gone down and those who are going to. I knew it was coming eventually and am sort of grateful my first time wasn't too extreme. Just goes to show you can never be too careful.

I've been trying to think about how it could have been avoided.. I guess its one of those things- No matter how much you try and minimize risk, its still there, and I couldn't be happier that I was geared up for the worst.

It really wouldn't be worth extra risk at all if I didn't love riding so much.
to becoming a better rider.
 
  #2  
Old 10-08-2011, 10:15 PM
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that saying is more for a major wreck than minor stuff like this. little things like this happen alot more than youd think. but ive been riding for a little over 4 years and rain is still sketchy unless im in a straigh line. nurse it back to health and be super careful next time it rains
 
  #3  
Old 10-08-2011, 11:18 PM
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This was an extremely minor accident, but it still wouldn't have taken much to have been horrible. If it had happened a couple seconds later and if I couldn't have got away from the bike...

I know its almost a certainty I'll be in a much worse accident at some point in the future, and I'm just glad this was so minor as to be insignificant.

That said... I hope this kind of thing doesn't happen too often
 
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Old 10-08-2011, 11:42 PM
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Well you walked away with only injury to your pride it sounds like

question is: what did you learn? I'm not being facetious. Road conditions can dump anyone pretty quickly. But there's always something to learn when it does. You said you felt the rear slip out. How do you think you could prevent it in the future?

And parking in a different lot on rainy days isn't an option
 
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:35 AM
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question is: what did you learn? I'm not being facetious. Road conditions can dump anyone pretty quickly. But there's always something to learn when it does. You said you felt the rear slip out. How do you think you could prevent it in the future?
Looking back, I think that I let off the throttle a little bit before I hit the dip. I'm thinking that took some weight off the rear tire right as it hit the puddle and caused it to slide out.
If nothing else I'm going to be more cautious in unfamiliar areas, especially with less than ideal road conditions.
 
  #6  
Old 03-01-2012, 10:53 AM
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im not a "good weather" rider. im the guy that rides, as long as it isn't snowing. my bike is my summertime DD, and while i dont have one right now. i can say that good tires are CRUCIAL if your going to ride in the rain. riding with a set of i originally had a set of Dunlop somethings, that didn't grip worth a crap, when i went to pirrelli angels, it made a world of difference.
second is your reaction to a loss of traction. the way traction control works, is by removing power from the wheels, and reapplying it. people might call me crazy, but to me the method works.

When i get a bike, i start out slow, and try everything i can, without trying, to ride "wrong" and see how the bike reacts, braking during cornering, full throttle as soon as you enter, sliding around corners in the rain. reasoning is, you become Familiar, with how the bike will react in the chance that you make a mistake (everyone does) and it will become muscle memory to react to those scenarios.

same with a car. when i get it, ill take it to its absolute limits, in the dry, rain, sleet or snow. and i know EXACTLY what it will handle. while i may have had a few fender benders during training for the worst, (nothing touch up paint couldnt fix)... ive NEVER been in a recordable accident, and ive yet to go down while riding (only been two seasons)

im not bragging, just sharing my experiance. my dad taught me, to know what the machine your using can handle, but also, to know what YOU can handle. while im happy ive never gone down, im sure i will eventually.

maybe this helped someone. maybe not. but im a firm believer, hope for the best, prepare for the worst.

if you trust yourself, feel free to try this out any way you feel comfortable.

if you get snow, find an empty parking lot, and just "play" with your car in the snow, rip your ebrake, slide around the lightposts, whatever. i guarantee the next time you straight line a corner in the snow, you wont panic, but cut the wheel, accelerate, and rip the e brake strategically putting you back on course. or you could be like the poor guy i was following yesterday.... and just meet the ditch.

sorry for the long posts... i feel like i need to lay out my thoughts completely.
 
  #7  
Old 03-01-2012, 12:45 PM
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I've been learning the hard way too, and my advice is this. if the conditions outside aren't riding weather, don't ride! dropped mine in December riding home from work at 10pm. Early in the day weather was great, but come the cold CO nightfall, a tiny bit of water condensed on the road, and then froze. slid out, high sided, and broke my collar bone.

obey the conditions, trust me no day of riding is worth 2k in hospital bills (like me) or worse, so just wait till it's sunny. no more rain riding.
 
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Old 03-01-2012, 01:20 PM
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Glad you are ok....I know exactly what you are talking about. I had a few close call similar situation. I was exiting out a parking lot, some building up the hill was over watering the lawn...water flows down the side walk, when i exit the drive way ramp, the puddle was no more than 7-9" flowing down, I had brand new Q2 tire broken in, and exit at a speed no more than 5-10mph, but when you exit into the street, you would lean a bit into the turn (if making a right)

Damn tire wash out!!! Luckily I had my riding boots, I was able to save it but pull a groin muscle...small puddle is like sand surface, debris, oil, algae accumulate...it's just road hazard...

If you did not throttle, maybe the rear may wash out a bit, and then you can react, save it, or somehow just drop the bike down less damage, but when throttle thru this puddle, it happen so fast, no time to react.

This is why riding takes 110% of your awareness, once you put down your guards, things may happen at the least expected.

But importantly, you are ok. Bike can be repair or replace. Your body is most important.





Originally Posted by bkubes View Post
Looking back, I think that I let off the throttle a little bit before I hit the dip. I'm thinking that took some weight off the rear tire right as it hit the puddle and caused it to slide out.
If nothing else I'm going to be more cautious in unfamiliar areas, especially with less than ideal road conditions.
 
  #9  
Old 03-01-2012, 06:18 PM
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Watch riding in the center of a lane in the rain. That's the same part of the road a car's
engine occupies. Where all of the oil and anti-freeze collects. Always try to stick to the
tire positions l/r and use caution when crossing over the center-sections. On a bike, standing
water, at any speeds, can cause hydro-planing when a car wouldn't have. We just don't
have the mass. Watch for splashes from the cars ahead, either avoid (if possible) or
slow down BEFORE you enter it. Once you're committed, everything is slow/smooth/gradual
changes till you reach safer footing.

Extra following distances, are a critical factor. You won't stop near as rapidly, in the wet.

The universal answer for bad conditions, of any sort, slower speeds,
smooth/gradual/relaxed input to the controls and good, lane planning/management.

I've put thousands of miles in conditions of down-pouring rain, sleet, snow and once hail.
The only times I've ever been down...dry pavement, doing something extremely stupid.

Gamble has a good point, as well. Practice is essential to safe riding. I am a big fan of
parking-lot practice. With a couple of markers you can practice braking in as short a
distance as possible. Start braking at a consistent speed/point, mark your effort.
Then start GRADUALLY beating it till the bike edges to loss of control/stability.
Once you know what you and the bike can do, keep trying to hit that mark, till you're
consistent.

The key is GRADUALLY, just keep beating your marker by a foot, six inches. Then try
to gain another foot, six inches.

QUIT if you get frustrated and or tired! Building muscle memory takes time.

Make a game of it. Try playing it on the street, but carefully! Build it into a routine
part of your riding discipline. Focus on smoooth, it's a skill that always pays off.

Good luck, Ern
 

Last edited by MadHattr059; 03-01-2012 at 06:21 PM.
  #10  
Old 03-01-2012, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by bkubes View Post
Looking back, I think that I let off the throttle a little bit before I hit the dip. I'm thinking that took some weight off the rear tire right as it hit the puddle and caused it to slide out.
If nothing else I'm going to be more cautious in unfamiliar areas, especially with less than ideal road conditions.
I just now saw this reply.

If you chopped throttle, more than likely you lost the rear SECOND. I'll bet what really happened is that + the dip caused the front to exceed the traction limits first. Decel causes weight to shift forward. You were already in a low traction situation. Putting more weight on the front prolly pushed it over the edge and the rear just followed suit.
 
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