Riding Skills Want to improve your skills on or off the track?

From 600 to 1000?

  #1  
Old 01-31-2012, 12:19 AM
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Default From 600 to 1000?

Alright gonna ask for some tips here cause the Yolanda in making a fool out of me. Stalled her at a light and sometimes she looks like a bucking bronco with her extremely sensitive throttle (her top end is still restricted but the full 190 HP up to 9k rpm is availible).

For any rider moving up in bikes, what would you guys that have experienced it suggest? Keep in mind, few bikes are availible with traction control so no suggestions that'd end with a rider standing on the street saying "wtf?!?" while the bike rides off into the sunset
 
  #2  
Old 01-31-2012, 03:18 AM
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All I can suggest is try to be smoother with the throttle. I know that is the obvious suggestion. Maybe shifting to a higher gear sooner will help. Many bikes are touchy in first gear. You should take my 1098s for a spin!
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-2012, 01:14 PM
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Kuro, You just need more time getting adjusted to the bike & its specific characteristics. Its similar to logging piloting time in dif types of aircraft...the more time you log in a specific aircraft, the more familiar you are w/ its characteristics, & the more comfortable you are.

I've got three bikes in my garage 600-1000. I most frequently switch off btwn my F4 & my RC51. The two are very dif in their handling characteristics. After awhile, it just becomes old-hat to you.
 
  #4  
Old 01-31-2012, 01:42 PM
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Ride at the lower revs is how i got adjusted... When i had my f2, i would always redline the ***** out of that bike and then when i got on an r1, i tried riding it the same way and it is completely different... lighter and MUCH MORE POWER... The first couple of rides i kept it under 7-8k rpms just to get a hang of it. then when i Bought my 954, it was a little easier to ride and to get adjusted to. and gradually i moved up in the rpms to get fully adjusted

I still forget how fast it is and then getting my 954 standing up on me cuz im riding it like a f2 but now i can control it alot more
 
  #5  
Old 01-31-2012, 04:19 PM
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Lol I'm forced to stay in the lower revs. It has a hard rpm limiter till 1st service
 
  #6  
Old 01-31-2012, 09:29 PM
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I think you'll be fine with more seat time. Although I have never had the pleasure of riding a beast such as yours . I don't know how tall your initial gearing is, but I found out my bike reacts well to simply letting out of the clutch slowly and then smoothly rolling on the throttle once the bike begins to move. I'm still on the clutch when I begin to give it gas though. My gas is just delayed slightly from the clutch. Of course, I tried this on my friends R1 and it didn't like it much. I had to actually add quite a bit of gas to get the thing rolling. Every bike is different though.

Also, I took out nearly all of the freeplay in my throttle. The 1000's are so sensative, it helped out the choppyness of my throttle inputs. Some people like it, some don't. For me, it worked out much better.

Also, make sure your idle rpms are not too low.
 
  #7  
Old 01-31-2012, 09:56 PM
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It's definitely a whole nother animal than Ororo. Right now, my lack of confidence in my throttle control is making me very timid on turns. Which is almost baseless as I felt the rear slipping while turning on those damn painted crosswalks. And the dtc kicked in to grab the street again.

The BMW is actually stupidly easy to ride. With the dtc you can go from closed to WOT and just take off like a cannon instead of getting catapult of the back. ABS will let you grab a fist full of brake and all you have to worry about is getting thrown over the bars instead of hitting the ground.

But that's not the point. I'm trying not to let those systems kick in.
 
  #8  
Old 02-01-2012, 08:41 AM
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well.... its just more control with the wrist. you'll get used to it though soon enough. the beemer has almost DOUBLE the hp that your f3 has... just take your time, you'll learn what kind inputs to make.


but just have confidence in yourself. you know how to ride. getting twitchy with the throttle around cornners is going to really upset the bike - and that WILL cause the TC to kick in.

it's going to just take a lil bit of time before you get comfortable with the throttle. it'll happen though.
 
  #9  
Old 02-02-2012, 01:30 PM
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It's just time in the seat like others have said. No other way to develop and hone your throttle control on a new bike.
 
  #10  
Old 04-14-2012, 01:50 PM
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When I first got my F4i (first bike ever), I spent the first week or two getting the bike moving in second gear while I got used to how sensitive the throttle was and how far to pull the clutch.
 
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