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What Gas do you run?

  #1  
Old 05-26-2009, 11:00 PM
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Default What Gas do you run?

I Just got my F4i 2 weeks ago...So I have only filled it up once. I always ran Premium w/ NO Ethanol (usually Shell) in my old Bandit. And I am doing the same thing w/ my F4i (except now there is a nice BP station close to my house that has no ethanol in their Premium gas.

So....Do you run low octane in your F4i (since thats all the manual calls for) or do you run higher octane? Also, Do you run ethanol mixes, or no?
 
  #2  
Old 05-26-2009, 11:20 PM
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Made for 86+ so I use 87 octane. Anything higher than what its made for is a gigantic waste of money, imho. The owners manual also states that you can use up to 10% ethanol by volume.
 

Last edited by teko1020; 05-26-2009 at 11:29 PM.
  #3  
Old 05-26-2009, 11:44 PM
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I always use premium. It's a 20 cent difference between fill ups. if you cant afford that you cant afford a toy imo.
 
  #4  
Old 05-26-2009, 11:57 PM
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Originally Posted by teko1020 View Post
Made for 86+ so I use 87 octane. Anything higher than what its made for is a gigantic waste of money, imho. The owners manual also states that you can use up to 10% ethanol by volume.
I didn't say you couldn't/shouldn't use ethanol...I just don't/won't.

This is a write up that a local Shop did about 18 months ago.

ETHANOL

A component of gasoline that is seeing increased use is ethanol. A member of the alcohol family, it is produced by vegetable matter (not just corn). Ethanol has three physical characteristics that distinguish it.

First, it has 30% fewer BTUs (British Thermal Units) per pound than gasoline. This means that a gallon of ethanol produces less power in an undiluted comparison with a gallon of gasoline and a corresponding reduction in power as percentage of its addition to gasoline (eg: 10% ethanol produces 3% less power with the same jetting). The E85 blend (15% gasoline, 85% ethanol) produces documented losses of mileage of 30-36%.

Second, the detonation suppression characteristics of ethanol and its cousin methanol allow it to be used to raise the effective octane of gasoline it is added to. Gasoline blenders will use this to build the higher octane numbers of mid-grade and premium gasoline. Ethanol’s reduced cost per gallon makes this very attractive. E85 is generally $0.50-0.60 cheaper per gallon than even the 10% dosed gasoline.

Third is the affinity of ethanol for water. Gas line de-icer is made of either methanol or isopropyl alcohol, chemical relatives of ethanol. This means water in the air will be drawn into the fuel. This accelerates the fuel’s degradation and decreases combustibility as explained in section 2. While the exposure to air is reduced in fuel-injected applications, it still is a factor. Combined with the alkaline reactivity of ethanol, fuel system components can suffer.

One other aspect of the ethanol content is just that. When the pump says “may contain up to 10% ethanol,” it may legally contain up to 20% by law, allowing for “error.” At this point in history, the use of ethanol is primarily a politically driven issue. The logic of the use of ethanol in the current format is flawed.

a) It costs more to produce a gallon than it sells for.

b) It accelerates the deterioration of gasoline in storage, even with the use of a
stabilizer.

c) It reduces the power and mileage in all conventional applications.

To allow the proper use of ethanol, compression ratios, cam timing, ignition timing, and jetting/fuel mapping need different configurations. While cams, ignition, and fuel can be adjusted on the fly, compression ratios are not easily or quickly changed. Having run alcohol-burning combinations for 25 years, this is an empirically determined fact.

One of the other less-publicized aspects of the ethanol debate is the fact that there is a $0.54 per gallon tariff on imported ethanol. Just ask your elected representative why this is. Politicians can’t regulate politics much less be trusted to properly regulate the economics and engineering aspects of normal lives. The ethanol debacle is continuing proof of that.

The final pinprick in the balloon of ethanol is the fact that last fall, we switched from BP gas with ethanol to Shell gasoline without ethanol and our gasoline problems have virtually disappeared, to our great delight.

So, if there is a choice – DO NOT USE ETHANOL-BLENDED GASOLINE! Only pure regular gasoline (read the pump carefully). A good way to avoid problems such as this is to be certain you buy gasoline at a name-brand station. The neighborhood convenience store buys gas from a broker, so you have no idea what it is. That gasoline is purchased by price, not specification

Remember- always buy brand name fuels, and avoid ethanol, to reduce the potential entertainment that accompanies poor quality gasoline.
 
  #5  
Old 05-27-2009, 12:07 AM
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Why ask the question if you won't use it? I figured you were trying to get other peoples opinions to make up your mind on what you would end up using. I was just repeating what the manual says. It's not required but its an option you have. I use the minimum because I don't feel like pissing my money away. There have been countless tests that disprove the notion that higher octane is better. You can argue that "It's only 20 cents more." Multiply that by the number of gallons you put in and how many times you fill up over an amount of time and I bet you can sit there and think of other things you wish you had that money for. I put 3 gallons in every time I fill up... That's 60 cents pissed away if I bought premium just because "bigger must be better" - each time.
 

Last edited by teko1020; 05-27-2009 at 12:20 AM.
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Old 05-27-2009, 12:54 AM
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I was just curious if anyone had any info that perhaps I hadn't heard yet. Or if anyone has had any fuel related problems/experiences, etc.
 
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Old 05-27-2009, 01:31 AM
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I use premium 90% of the time. The only time I go mid grade is if I know I'm going to be making a long, highway trip, and won't need "the best". But yeah, ^ 35 cents, yeah, shell it out cheapos.
 
  #8  
Old 05-27-2009, 06:51 AM
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Dont get anything lower than 95 in the UK, used to run 99 on my KTM. 95 is currently $1.56 per litre. 99 is around $1.66 per litre.
 

Last edited by twist; 05-27-2009 at 06:54 AM.
  #9  
Old 05-27-2009, 09:38 AM
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At most gas stations around here we have 3 choices: 87, 89, 92. I go with 89. Tried 87 and 92 and cant tell a difference in power but read in a previous post that 92 actually decreases horsepower in the f4i and the manual says 86 so i figured I would meet halfway in the argument but lean towards the lower grade of gas being sufficient.
 
  #10  
Old 05-27-2009, 10:06 AM
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93...cause...why not? Its only going to be .50 more per fill up...
 

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