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How to ride the F4i to its potential

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Old 05-09-2010, 12:45 AM
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Default How to ride the F4i to its potential

So I rode my first "real" bike today and was hoping for pointers and common techniques that everyone uses with these bike. I was hoping that My fellow F4i owners could share some insight about specifically riding the F4i and what are common annoyances with the bike and in the same common techniques on how it should be ridden (i.e 3rd is a good cruising gear and the F4i makes its power at what rpm and the F4i likes to be shifted around what rpm etc...) just looking for some advise from experienced F4i riders that all. I want to play into the bikes specific strengths and shy away from its common weakness's and known issues! More than anything, I just want to become familiar and comfortable with the bike and I thought everyones input could help me out ; )

The major thing I noticed was the clutch. Its almost like I had to let the thing damn near out to find the friction zone! Is this normal or does the clutch lever just need some adjusting? Seems like with these bikes it is very easy to "pop" the clutch and smack quickly between gears without having a somewhat large clutch friction zone. The friction zone seems small. Also, Its not that I dont "like" the location/stance of the handle bars, but I think raising them 3/4" with these risers would help out...Anybody have them or have experience with them? Can I install them myself? Here are my first two mods!

Thanks everyone.

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Last edited by 600F4inoober; 05-09-2010 at 01:00 AM.
  #2  
Old 05-09-2010, 03:05 AM
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Typically I'll cruise somewhere between 4-6K RPM around town, but a lot higher on the highways. The real torque doesn't kick in until 6K+.
As for the clutch engaging so far out, it's normal. Either get used to it, or you can get aftermarket adjustable levers. Initially I didn't like them, but now it doesn't even cross my mind having the OEM levers, or the length of pull. When you release the clutch while taking off, it should be real quick, and when shifting at speed, it should only be pulled for a fraction of a second; real quickly.
The bars initially were a little uncomfortable, but one can get used to those too.
Nice looking pipe...
 
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Old 05-09-2010, 01:32 PM
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Clutching and shifting should be really quick, or you're going to have a jerky ride. If I'm accelerating a decent amount in the upper gears (but nothing like WOT), I'll often omit clutching altogether. Release tension on the throttle for a split second while you flick the shift lever up and then grasp the throttle again. I've had undetectable shifts doing that. Getting the right amount of throttle going into and out of your shift is very important for a smooth ride (not to mention the life of your tranny/clutch), but it's something that you'll really just have to get a feel for.

As for handlebar risers, I wouldn't mind having some on mine. They're not necessary, but they would help maintain comfort for a longer period of time. If you plan on doing a lot of commuting, cruising around, or scenic-type rides, you'd probably appreciate them.
 
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Old 05-09-2010, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by kowen1208 View Post
Clutching and shifting should be really quick, or you're going to have a jerky ride. If I'm accelerating a decent amount in the upper gears (but nothing like WOT), I'll often omit clutching altogether. Release tension on the throttle for a split second while you flick the shift lever up and then grasp the throttle again. I've had undetectable shifts doing that. Getting the right amount of throttle going into and out of your shift is very important for a smooth ride (not to mention the life of your tranny/clutch), but it's something that you'll really just have to get a feel for.

As for handlebar risers, I wouldn't mind having some on mine. They're not necessary, but they would help maintain comfort for a longer period of time. If you plan on doing a lot of commuting, cruising around, or scenic-type rides, you'd probably appreciate them.
Thanks guys Im getting a feel for it...in my parking lot Only been to third
Kowen, you stated that you will ofter "omit" clutching all together...do you mean that you just shift without the clutch? Does it go to the next gear even? If it does isnt that bad?
 
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Old 05-09-2010, 08:32 PM
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These bikes(really most bikes) have sequential "dog box" transmissions and are fully capable of clutchless shifting. It is harder on the gear dogs, though, and can eventually lead to problems with slipping out of gear. How long before taking its toll is highly variable.
 
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Old 05-09-2010, 08:40 PM
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What experience do you have riding bikes?
 
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Old 05-09-2010, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Kuroshio View Post
What experience do you have riding bikes?
I'm very cautious and I just finished a 3 day motorcycle beginners class. I grew up riding atv's though but a bike like this is obviously different. SO it sounds like clutch-less shifting should only be done in moderation and possibly in a emergency situation huh? Thanks
 
  #8  
Old 05-09-2010, 09:06 PM
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"Done in moderation" is a good way to put it.
 
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Old 05-09-2010, 09:15 PM
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Done when you have gotten to know your bike very well. A lot of the stuff you're asking will be dependent on your bike and its personality. Example, my bike had barely finished teething at 25xx miles when I got her. 3rdgenlxi's F4i with 177k+ miles is prolly very set in her ways.

Get some seat time before trying a lot of the stuff you see guys talking about. You'll get a feel for it and your own individual riding style. At what rpms and gear you feel safe riding around town in. And where your bike best responds to what you want to do.
 
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Old 05-09-2010, 09:50 PM
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"Done in moderation" is a good way to put it.
That is a good way to put it, and I probably wouldn't even worry about speed shifting quite yet.

Also, the clutch gripping late is normal like others have said. I use two fingers to clutch, so I have to have that play for my other 2 fingers to stay on the bar without the clutch grabbing.

On the gen-mar risers in your first pic, I have them on my 1000F. I like them. Kinda pricey, but they came with my bike....
It's a matter of personal preference, I guess. I take some long rides, and any little bit helps.
 

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